Inside the Beltway: Who is James E. Risch?

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“Would you say that your overall opinion of Sen. Tim Scott is favorable or unfavorable?” asks a new Winthrop University poll of South Carolina voters released Wednesday.

The answer: 55 percent of voters gave Mr. Scott a “favorable” response; the number was 73 percent among Republicans. Seventy-two percent of the voters overall, along with 79 percent of Republicans, gave a positive response to Mr. Scott’s recent appointment to take the seat that was vacated by Jim DeMint, incoming president of the Heritage Foundation.

FIORINA’S ROOTS

Former Hewlett-Packard CEO and U.S. Senate hopeful Carly Fiorina recently addressed the Ripon Society’s annual legislative symposium, revealing that although she was a Stanford University graduate, she dropped out of law school, then called on ancient skills to get by.

“I worked at a hairdresser’s, not doing hair, but doing the appointments, and closing up the cash drawer at night. I was a really good secretary. I could type 87 words a minute,” she recalled. “I took the first job I was offered, which was to be a secretary, a receptionist actually, for a little nine-person firm. I typed, I filed, I answered the phones. I had no idea what I was going to do with my life. I just needed to pay the rent. The only reason I got headed towards business is because two gentleman in that small business came up to my desk one day and said, ‘You know, we’ve been watching you. Maybe you can do more than type and file.’”

Mrs. Fiorina adds, “Now I have been privileged to travel around the world and meet with all kinds of people. And I know that in 2013, this is still the only country on the face of the Earth where a young girl can graduate with a degree in medieval history and philosophy, drop out of law school, go to work as a secretary, and ultimately have the privilege to run the largest technology company in the world. That is only possible in the United States of America.”

POLL DU JOUR

• 92 percent of Republicans say preventing future acts of international terrorism is a “very important” foreign-policy goal; 86 percent of Democrats agree.

• 86 percent of Republicans say preventing the spread of nuclear weapons is a very important goal; 84 percent of Democrats agree.

• 70 percent of Republicans say defending our allies’ security is a very important goal; 57 percent of Democrats agree.

• 44 percent of Republicans say defending human rights in other countries is a very important goal; 64 percent of Democrats agree.

• 42 percent of Republicans say that working with the United Nations is a very important goal; 75 percent of Democrats agree.

• 22 percent of Republicans say promoting economic development in other countries is a very important goal; 40 percent of Democrats agree.

Source: A Gallup poll of 1,055 U.S. adults conducted Feb. 7 to 10.

• Grumbles, mumbles, press releases to jharper@washingtontimes.com.

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