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“It’s tough to connect the two right now in terms of a potential redevelopment and what occurred,” Chitwood said. “We were prepared yesterday, had emergency medical respond. As we learn from this, you bet: If there are things that we can incorporate into the future, whether it’s the current property now or any other redevelopment, we will.

“The key is sitting down with NASCAR, finding out the things that happened and how we deal with them.”

Daytona reexamined its fencing and ended up replacing the entire thing following Carl Edwards’ scary crash at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama in 2009. Edwards’ car sailed into the fence and spewed debris into the stands.

“We’ve made improvements since then,” Chitwood said. “I think that’s the key: that we learn from this and figure out what else we need to do.”

Three-time Indianapolis 500 winner Johnny Rutherford said Sunday that things should be done across auto racing. It was just 16 months ago that IndyCar driver Dan Wheldon was killed when his car crashed into a fence at Las Vegas.

“Maybe we need a double fence, one behind the other, with maybe a space in between to do something to stop this,” Rutherford said. “There’s a lot of things. I’m sure NASCAR and the IndyCar series are looking at everything to make it safer. What happened yesterday was a terrible thing.

“The drivers, we accept that. That’s part of the game. We have to roll the dice and move on. But you don’t want to involve the fans.”

Chitwood said any fans who felt uncomfortable with their up-close seating for the Daytona 500 could exchange their tickets for spots elsewhere.

“If fans are unhappy with their seating location or if they have any incidents, we would relocate them,” Chitwood said. “So we’ll treat that area like we do every other area of the grandstand. If a fan is not comfortable where they’re sitting, we make every accommodation we can.”

Few fans seemed willing to relocate.

“Real NASCAR fans ain’t scared,” said Zeb Daniels, who was attending his fifth Daytona 500 with his daughter. “If we see anything coming to the fence, we’ll hit the floor and pray.”

So why take a chance?

“We come for the thrill, the excitement,” Daniels said. “We can feel the heat, the tire rubber in our eyes.”