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“I’m not sure we have all the answers,” Davis said. “We’re not the only ones doing it. But I sense that the industry, if it really tries, can make a dent on this.”

Davis also said the USGA wants to promote more 9-hole rounds and different formats, such as match play or the Stableford system, to move things along.

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GANGNAM STYLE: James Hahn is off to a solid start in his rookie season on the PGA Tour, and he’s already made a name for himself.

All because of one birdie. And one dance. On one very famous hole.

Hahn heard some of the chatter about how to react with a birdie on the 16th hole of the Phoenix Open, the rowdiest hole in golf. He thought about the Aaron Rodgers “Discount Double Check” move or even waving the left hand like Beyoncé in “If You Like It.”

He settled on Psy’s “Gangnam Style,” dancing his way off the green as the crowd roared. Two days later, the YouTube views were approaching 200,000 hits.

“I can’t believe that I did that,” Hahn said. “It’s bringing the fun back into golf, especially with me being a rookie. It gives me a little breathing room, an ice-breaker for me and a welcome. Whether you guys hear from me, if this is my last event or if this is the first of 100 press conferences, it’s all a fun experience for me.”

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THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT: The U.S. Open at Merion will be the shortest course for a major championship in eight years.

USGA executive director Mike Davis said Merion, which has not hosted a major since 1981, will be 6,992 yards on the scorecard. The last major course that was under 7,000 yards was Shinnecock Hills for the 2004 U.S. Open, which played 6,996 yard. Merion will be the shortest since Southern Hills, which was 6,973 in 2001.

Retief Goosen won both those U.S. Opens.

“Merion is just this wonderful blend of short and long holes,” Davis said at the USGA’s annual meeting. “By the time you walk off the fourth green, you’re done with the par 5s. … I think it’s going to be unique in the sense that you are going to see many more birdie opportunities at Merion than you are going to see at most any other U.S. Opens. But also, there are some critically tough holes at Merion.”

It’s small in other ways.

The USGA decided to cut down on tickets because Merion, located near Philadelphia, is not a big piece of property like Bethpage Black or Pinehurst. The USGA will take a financial hit compared with other venues, but it felt it was worth it.

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