- Associated Press - Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Chip Kelly made his bones as a football coach by doing things fast.

By most standards, though, his leap into the NFL was agonizingly slow.

The Philadelphia Eagles finally got their man Wednesday when Kelly reversed course and agreed to replace the fired Andy Reid. The news came as a shock to most in Oregon, where Kelly was last reported to be busy recruiting and getting the new uniforms ready for next season.

It took a while, but in the end the lure of the NFL won out over job security and fame in the Pacific Northwest. It almost always does with coaches who learn early in their careers that the best way to the top is to keep climbing the ladder.


But there’s a reason Kelly couldn’t bring himself to say yes to the Cleveland Browns, rebuffed the Buffalo Bills and initially turned the Eagles down when they first came begging for him to sign. There’s a reason he went back to Oregon, seemingly ending his flirtation with the NFL for the year.

Because no matter how good college coaches are _ and Kelly was superb in four seasons at Oregon _ winning games on Saturdays is not a guarantee for success in the NFL.

Nick Saban found that out when he left LSU for the Miami Dolphins in 2005. After two mediocre seasons in Miami, he couldn’t leave town fast enough when Alabama came courting with an offer to return to the college ranks.

Now he’s got three BCS championships at Alabama, a statue of himself outside the stadium and a reputation as a genius in the college ranks. All that while still making NFL-type money coaching the Crimson Tide.

“I kind of learned from that experience that maybe (college) is where I belonged,” Saban said earlier this month when he returned to Miami to win the BCS title in the same stadium where he coached the Dolphins. “And I’m really happy and at peace with all of that.”

Steve Spurrier seems plenty happy at South Carolina, too, just like he once was in Florida. He won a national championship with the Gators and might have stayed there for life had the Washington Redskins not come calling with what was then the richest coaching contract in NFL history.

The head ball coach went 12-20 in two seasons, losing 10 of his last 12, including a home shutout against Dallas that had fans pelting the sidelines with snowballs in disgust. Spurrier was so eager to get out of Washington that he quit before he could be fired, giving up the remaining $15 million left on his contract.

“Maybe someone else can do better,” Spurrier said then. “It’s a long, tough grind, coaching in the NFL.”

It is, and there’s only so much a college coach can do to prepare for the job. The Xs and Os are all mostly the same, but the parity in the NFL is why coaches spend 16 hours a day almost every day trying to find some way to get an edge on the opposition.

Like those before him, Kelly will go from worrying about recruiting to worrying about a salary cap. He’ll go from dealing with college kids who don’t have two quarters in their pocket to dealing with millionaires with entourages. He’ll go from being able to fool other teams with his offense to being able to fool no one.

And he’ll have to do it with no NFL experience at all. Before moving to Oregon six years ago, Kelly’s biggest job was offensive coordinator at New Hampshire. And while his record at Oregon is a gaudy one _ 46-7 _ the reality is he’s only been a head coach for four years.

Story Continues →