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Former FBI director Louis Freeh released findings July 12 in the school’s internal investigation of the scandal. Freeh accused the coach and three former school administrators of covering up allegations against Sandusky.

The retired defensive coordinator has been sentenced to at least 30 years in prison after being convicted of 45 criminal counts. Prosecutors said the sexual abuse occurred off and on campus, including at the football facility. Sandusky has denied the allegations.

On July 22, Penn State removed Paterno’s statue, which was a gathering point for mourners last January. The next day, the NCAA reacted with uncharacteristic swiftness in levying strict sanctions including a four-year bowl ban, strict scholarship cuts and a $60 million fine.

Paterno was also stripped of 111 victories, meaning he no longer held the major college record of 409 career wins.

Penn State is still coping with the massive fallout from the scandal. On Tuesday, a young man who testified that Sandusky tickled and grabbed him in a campus shower sued the retired assistant coach, his charity and the university.

But Paterno’s family and the three administrators have vehemently denied Freeh’s allegations as well as suspicions they took part in a cover-up. Paterno’s family has been planning what a spokesman has called a comprehensive response to Freeh’s findings.

But on Tuesday, the family remained in private.

After visiting Paterno’s grave with his friend Hamm, Nick Bucci said he felt his school handled the scandal well overall, given the extent of the fallout, with some exceptions.

Bucci said the school should honor Paterno someday — but not without more perspective.

“A day like today, those emotions might be high,” said Bucci, of Dayton, Md. “I don’t think now is the time to do it. I think you have to wait.”