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Oct. 26 _ NHL cancels games through Nov. 30, raising total to 326 (26.5 percent).

Nov. 2 _ NHL cancels Jan. 1 Winter Classic between Toronto and Detroit at Ann Arbor, Mich.

Nov. 21 _ Union makes proposal offering to split hockey-related revenue 50-50 with $392 million “make-whole provision” for existing contracts that is $182 million more than management’s offer. NHL Commissioner Gary Between says sides are “far apart.”

Nov. 23 _ NHL cancels games through Dec. 14, raising total to 422 (34 percent of season), and All-Star weekend for Jan. 26-27 at Columbus, Ohio.

Nov. 28-29 _ The sides meet with two members of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, who agree they are far apart.

Dec. 10 _ NHL cancels games through Dec. 30, raising total to 526 (43 percent of season).

Dec. 14 _ A day after negotiations break off, NHL files a class action suit against the union in U.S. District Court in New York, seeking to establish its lockout is legal, and files an unfair labor practice charge with the National Labor Relations Board, claiming the union has bargained in bad faith.

Dec. 20 _ NHL cancels games through Jan. 14, raising total to 625 (51 percent of season).

Dec. 27 _ NHL makes new proposal.

Dec. 31 _ Negotiations resume.

Jan. 4 _ Federal mediator Scot Beckenbaugh shuttles between the sides.

Jan. 6 _ On the 113th day of the lockout, the sides reach agreement on a 10-year contract that either side can terminate after eight years. Hockey-related income will be split 50-50. Free-agent contracts will be limited to a maximum seven years (eight for clubs to re-sign their own players). Salaries in contracts can’t vary more than 35 percent year to year, and the final year can’t be more than 50 percent of the highest year. The salary cap for the upcoming season will be $70.2 million, and it will go down to $64.3 million in 2013-14.