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EDITORIAL: Obamacare blues

The left is learning that apologies are for losers

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A debater running out of good arguments is always tempted to get mean and personal. The remaining liberal defenders of Obamacare are demonstrating this truism once more with frantic agitation over a new anti-Obamacare television commercial by Americans for Prosperity.

These community activists are spending $1 million to air a 30-second spot featuring Julie, a mother of two, talking about what Obamacare means to her. "I have some questions about Obamacare," she says. "Can I really trust the folks in Washington with my family's health care? I think we all deserve some answers."

This is not a typical commercial relying on shock to get attention through free media. It's a simple and direct expression of the doubt and frustration shared by anyone who thinks hard about the health care takeover. There's a minimum of Washington argle-bargle. Most Americans have no idea what a "health care exchange" is, or how it will affect their lives. They understand Julie.

Americans for Prosperity is tapping into the uncertainty by targeting female viewers on cable networks like the Food Channel. The idea that conservatives would wage a battle on what's traditionally considered a safe, Democratic demographic sent the New York Times, Huffington Post, ThinkProgress and Bloomberg rumbling off to battle stations. Each outlet ran op-ed pieces about the commercial, each with suspiciously similar headlines attacking David and Charles Koch, the successful businessmen who back with their money Americans for Prosperity. The thrust of the critics' message is that the commercial is false, or misleading, or humbuggery or all of the above, because the Koch brothers, who made their money without government help, paid for it.

This is the desperation of the Obamacare apologists. A Gallup survey finds that only 9 percent of small-business owners believe the health care takeover will be good for their business; 41 percent of them are holding back on new hires. This must be because the Koch brothers are evil for pointing that out.

Even the administration lacks confidence in Obamacare, or it wouldn't be delaying the employer mandate. Nor would the Department of Health and Human Services be sinking many millions of dollars on high-dollar public relations firms to gild the facts. It wouldn't be hiring "navigators" to guide the public through the paperwork nightmare.

If the liberals can't believe conservatives, they could listen closely to the Democrats in the Senate. Max Baucus of Montana was one of the first to break ranks, calling Obamacare a train wreck. "I agree with him," Harry Reid of Nevada, the leader of the Democrats, chimed in. Chuck Schumer of New York recognizes that health insurance premiums are going up and that "it's in part because of Obamacare." Ron Wyden of Oregon fears what's coming: "There is reason to be very concerned about what's going to happen with young people."

The "progressive" news outlets reveal themselves to be Mr. Obama's last loyal soldiers, still willing to peddle his tattered campaign promise that Americans will be able to choose their own doctors under Obamacare. They ignore the reality that doctors are quitting in droves as their profession is to be run into the ground. The effect already is obvious in the medical schools. The Association of American Medical Colleges reports that "the passage of health care reform will exacerbate a physician shortage," which will reach 62,900 in just two years.

Implementation of Obamacare won't be pretty, and everyone knows it. That's why the left is so frightened by Julie and her brutally revealing questions about Obamacare.

The Washington Times

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

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