The yellow British Open awaits at Muirfield

Question of the Day

Should Congress make English the official language of the U.S.?

View results

“No, that was his normal shot,” Cabrera replied with a laugh.

The 441-yard eighth hole proved to be a great example of playing the ball in the air and on land. Cabrera looked at the pot bunkers that dotted the landscape on the right side of the fairway and chose a 6-iron off the tee to keep left of the trouble, and to keep his ball from running through into high grass. His only other option was to hit driver over the trouble.

Teeing up another ball, he launched his driver high and long _ far different from the low, penetrating flight on the sixth hole _ and the ball stopped rolling when it went into a cross bunker about 40 yards short of the green.

“There’s no way to know how far the ball is going,” he said to Fernandez-Castano, who opted for a 5-iron off the tee.

The forecast is for dry conditions the entire week, which could make the British Open tougher than usual. Then again, players were quick to remember the last time at Muirfield in 2002. It wasn’t nearly this dry _ that was a “green” Open _ though the weather was reasonable until a freak storm arrived without warning on Saturday.

The wind chill plunged into the low 40s, the wind approach 40 mph and the rain was relentless. Woods was just enough off his game that he shot 81 that day, ending his hopes of a calendar Grand Slam.

“It’s amazing golf,” Harrington said. “Someone genuinely can hit a drive 400 yards, and then turn around and be able to carry it 240 yards. It suits the guy who can manipulate his golf ball, which is what links golf is all about.”

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Get Adobe Flash player