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Bay thinks Braun could have handled his situation differently.

“If you look at the guys who have done stuff and just come out and admit it, a lot of guys don’t remember who those guys were,” Bay said. “But the guys who run up and down and say, `No, no,’ and then it gets drug through the mud 10 times worse, it makes it tougher on themselves and the rest of us.”

It appears more penalties are coming, too.

Braun was one of a dozen players targeted by MLB, including injured New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez, following a report by Miami New Times in January that they had been connected with Biogenesis of America, a now-closed anti-aging clinic.

“The guys that are cheating or whatever are taking something away from the other players. They’re lying to the fans, they’re lying to their teammates, they’re lying to their GMs, their owners, and they’re going to get caught,” Angels pitcher C.J. Wilson said.

San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy thinks MLB is “doing a great job” of attempting to clean up the sport.

“I think it’s important for the integrity of the game. With the kids who are coming up to play baseball, it’s an important message to them, the fans, and also the players that do it right,” he said.

Still, others can’t understand why PEDs remain an issue.

“For these guys still to be involved with this stuff just baffles me. The education’s there and everybody knows what you can and can’t take,” Miami Marlins manager Mike Redmond said. “It baffles me that this continues to be a black cloud over the game. I know Major League Baseball’s done a great job of cleaning up the game and the testing policy and all that. And it’s working. But at the same time, too, it seems like we’ll go through a lull and then, bam, here comes another guy that gets suspended. It’s got to stop.”

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AP Sports Writers Tim Booth and Ronald Blum, AP Baseball Writer Janie McCauley, and AP freelance writers Mike Kelly and Jack Etkin in Denver contributed to this report.