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‘Easiest job ever’: Weiner’s sexting partner Sydney Leathers brags about being a prostitute

- The Washington Times - Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Sydney Leathers, the 23-year-old high school dropout at the heart of the new Anthony Weiner sexting scandal, bragged online to having earned thousands of dollars by having sex with older men and offering "dates for dollars," The Daily Mail first reported.

In the Facebook exchanges, beginning April 12, 2013 and lasting at least three months, Miss Leathers tells her friend Lou Colagiovanni, 29, that she's "seeing this one sugar daddy right now who pays me $1000," for sex acts lasting up to half an hour.

Mr. Weiner has steadfastly refused to quit the New York City mayoral race, despite several calls for his resignation by those in his own party. On Sunday, his campaign manager Danny Kemed resigned.

In subsequent messages with Mr. Colagiovanni, Miss Leathers refers to having sex for money as her "gig."

Mr. Coligiovanni joked that it was "nice when you can enjoy your work."

"Easiest 'job' ever lol," she responded.

In an exchange dated July 10 this year, just two weeks before Mr. Weiner issued a public apology next to his wife Huma, Miss Leathers revealed to Mr. Colagiovanni that she had "A date for $ tomorrow."

The self-proclaimed mistress got over her fears of being exposed by Mr. Weiner opponents and quickly embraced the prospect of earning "hundreds of thousands of dollars" by selling her story, the Daily Mail reported.

"I shall ruin his campaign one way or another. Muahahaha," she said.

In a message to the Daily Mail Monday night, Mr. Weiner reiterated that he has no plans of bowing out of the race, and even asked for donations "of $10, $20, anything" to help him "fight back."

"I waged this campaign on a bet that the citizens of my city would be more interested in a vision for improving their lives rather than in old stories about mine," he said.

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