Egyptian factions work on compromise on premiership as protests continue

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Outside Rabaa al-Adawiya, Brotherhood supporters waved flags as young men wearing makeshift helmets jogged in place and did calisthenics as part of security teams the group says are to defend its rallies from attack.

“Do we not deserve democracy? Aren’t we worth anything?” said an emotional Alaa el-Saim, a retired army engineer in a broad-brimmed hat to protect from the sun. He pointed to the shooting by troops on Friday of pro-Morsi protesters. “It’s the first time I’ve seen that — the army shoots at us with weapons they bought with the taxes I paid.”

Khaled Galal, a young bearded man in a skull cap, called the army’s actions the “rape of legitimacy.”

“Muslims aren’t allowed democracy, and when we pick up weapons to defend it, we get called terrorists,” he said.

• AP correspondents Paul Schemm and Tony G. Gabriel contributed to this article.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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