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The 6-foot-2 Rask helped the Bruins finish second in the Northeast Division, then raised his game to another level in the playoffs. He shut down high-scoring Pittsburgh in the Eastern Conference finals, allowing just two goals and recording a .985 save percentage in a sweep.

The impressive performance against the Penguins included 53 saves in Game 3, giving Patrice Bergeron enough time to net the winning goal in the second overtime of a 2-1 victory.

“He’s just, I think, fundamentally a good goalie,” Boston defenseman Andrew Ference said after the Bruins arrived in Chicago on Tuesday. “As far as positioning and his style, he has a very consistent style, so he doesn’t really get himself into I think too many bad situations.”

Antti Niemi, another Finnish goalie who is good friends with Rask, was in net when the Blackhawks won the title in 2010. But he signed with San Jose in the ensuing offseason while Chicago worked through salary cap issues.

The Blackhawks then signed Marty Turco to start in goal, and planned to have Crawford serve as the backup. Those plans eventually fell apart and Crawford earned the starting nod. He won at least 30 games in each of his first two seasons in a regular role, and then went 19-5 with a career-best 1.94 GAA this year.

“He’s had a lot to overcome,” said defenseman Brent Seabrook, who was selected by Chicago in the first round of that same 2003 draft. “Whether it’s been fighting for position, fighting for jobs, we brought some guys in, I think he’s kept his composure. I think he’s worked real hard.”

With Crawford in goal, the Blackhawks lost in the first round of the playoffs in each of the previous two seasons. Surrounded by the core of the Stanley Cup-winning team, the 28-year-old Crawford still had to learn about playing in the postseason.

He’s come a long way.

“I’d say I learned a lot, especially some of the goals I gave up last year I wasn’t very happy with,” Crawford said. “Just able to learn from that. Get over it, and move on. No matter what happens, there’s always a next shot so you have to make sure you’re there to save the next one.”

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Jay Cohen can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/jcohenap