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“Of course if you look at the result, being 1-1, it’s not bad. But you don’t want to play like this in an NBA Finals,” Ginobili said. “You don’t want to give them that much confidence, and you feeling bad about yourself.”

Parker managed only five baskets in 14 attempts while making five turnovers, and Ginobili had three of the Spurs‘ 17 turnovers that led to 19 points Sunday, after the team tied a finals low with four turnovers in a Game 1 victory.

The Spurs, like every other team in the NBA, know there’s no way to beat the Heat with that kind of ball handling.

“We have to play better. Definitely have to play better,” Parker said. “You know, we’re playing the defending champs. They’re a great team. We knew they were going to come in and play with a lot more energy and play harder. That’s what they did tonight.

“So it’s always easy to bounce back after a loss, and now it’s our turn to see how we’re going to handle our loss and how we’re going to respond.”

Big Three against Big Three provided plenty of buildup to the series, and Ginobili said the Spurs stand little chance of winning if their trio plays poorly.

But James, having seen the Heat not have enough when they were largely just he, Wade and Chris Bosh two years ago, insists his current team is deep enough to do big damage even when it doesn’t come from the big names.

“I think the supporting cast is really why both teams are here,” James said. “They’ve been making an impact all year long, and they feel like their supporting cast is better. We feel like our supporting cast is better. It’s who goes out and do it each and every night to help seal wins.”

The Spurs are shooting just 41 percent and averaging 88 points in the series, perhaps lucky to not be down 2-0, and realize they needed to be much sharper when they got back home.

“It’s about getting refocused here, playing a much better game, ending quarters better, and hopefully shooting better,” Duncan said.