LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Cruz an emerging GOP star

Story Topics
Question of the Day

Is it still considered bad form to talk politics during a social gathering?

View results

I was able to listen closely to Sen. Ted Cruz, Texas Republican, for the first time at a Princeton reunion June 1. I was impressed with Mr. Cruz as a man, a legal scholar and a passionate American on so many diverse levels — thanks to a forum devoid of liberal media filtration, manipulation, blackout and bias.

The format of the talk was a challenging Q&A via Prof. Robert George, and it included live audience questions, no speechwriters or teleprompter needed. Mr. Cruz’s message: The future of the conservative movement and the Republican Party both require fearless, passionate and committed new blood to come forward with vigor.

As an honors Princeton University and Harvard Law School graduate, Mr. Cruz clearly has the brains to lead. As a topnotch debater, U.S. Supreme Court and Constitution expert, he clearly has the judicial brawn to lead. As a speaker, Mr. Cruz tells it like it is in a most resonating and educating way, translating complex political and economic quandaries posed by Mr. George and the audience into concepts that conservatives can act upon.

After an articulate and insightful two hours of discourse, Mr. Cruz earned a standing ovation, in a packed McCosh Hall, with mainly Republicans and some moderate Democrats in attendance. All in all, this razor-sharp Texan came across as an honest, conservative American who is brave enough to revive the Republican Party, help take on and defeat Hillary Rodham Clinton in 2016, and explain to voters that “the next president of the United States should be the candidate who is truly leading the most” — and not merely the next politician in line for the gold watch.

BARON CHRISTOPHER HANSON

Charleston, S.C.

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks
You Might Also Like
  • Maureen McDonnell looks on as her husband, former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, made a statement on Tuesday after the couple was indicted on corruption charges. (associated press)

    PRUDEN: Where have the big-time grifters gone?

  • This photo taken Jan. 9, 2014,  shows New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie gesturing as he answers a question during a news conference  at the Statehouse in Trenton.  Christie will propose extending the public school calendar and lengthening the school day in a speech he hopes will help him rebound from an apparent political payback scheme orchestrated by key aides. The early front-runner for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination will make a case Tuesday Jan. 14, 2014, that children who spend more time in school graduate better prepared academically, according to excerpts of his State of the State address obtained by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    BRUCE: Bombastic arrogance or humble determination? Chris Christie’s choice

  • ** FILE ** Secretary of State Hillary Rodham testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Chris Stevens and three other Americans. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

    PRUDEN: The question to haunt the West

  • Get Breaking Alerts