- Associated Press - Saturday, June 15, 2013

ARDMORE, PA. (AP) - Garry Van Arkel got a taste of what was in store when the U.S. Golf Association commandeered part of his property for parking and turned his tennis court into a security tent worthy of Philadelphia International Airport.

Folks like Van Arkel, who live in the stately homes lining the perimeter of Merion Golf Club, suddenly have 25,000 new best friends for drinks and nibbles and hanging out in genteel surroundings.

Who knew, the block party of the summer could be found on Golf House Road.

Then again, there was little choice.


To pull off the U.S. Open, which hadn’t been played at Merion since 1981, club officials needed help from members, many of whom live on properties practically flush against the course. Back then, there may have been a few tents sprinkled here and there. Now, they’re everywhere, for merchandise, sponsors and sprawling hospitality villages.

So when the call went out for tennis courts, front yards, and driveways, the neighbors didn’t need much time to say yes.

“Hey, it’s all part of the deal,” said Van Arkel, who works in investment services. “If you want to have the U.S. Open after 32 years, this is what you’ve got to do.”

You’ve got to look away when your yard starts looking like a Monster Truck rally tore through.

You’ve got to get used to those giant white tents.

You’ve got to turn a deaf ear to the air conditioning units and generators now a whisker away from your flower beds.

Van Arkel, a club member who lives on College Avenue, has lost his backyard tennis court for about a month. The oversized “Welcome to the 113th U.S. Open” entrance tent for media and volunteers was plopped on the court, complete with baggage scanners and ID checks.

His yard was fenced in about a month ago and he was recently told he’d probably have to live with it another month before it’s removed.

The USGA rented a vacant property near his house and cleared a path for carts to whisk VIPs away.

He refused to disclose how much he was paid for use of his land in one of the priciest areas in suburban Philadelphia. But Van Arkel called estimates of six-figure rent checks absurd.

Not far down the road, Bob and Joanie Hall’s driveway just off the 16th tee morphed into Party Central. And every party needs a few good rumors.

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