Mickelson has silver market cornered in US Open

Question of the Day

Should Congress make English the official language of the U.S.?

View results

ARDMORE, PA. (AP) - The U.S. Golf Association is not opposed to inflicting cruel and unusual punishment at its premier championship, so here’s something it might want to consider.

Award the “Phil Mickelson Medal” to the runner-up in the U.S. Open.

There is precedent. The U.S. Open champion has received a gold medal ever since this brute of a tournament began in 1895, and yet the USGA tinkered with 117 years of tradition by last year changing the name to the “Jack Nicklaus Medal.”

An argument can be made that Nicklaus, a four-time champion, isn’t even the face of the U.S. Open. Bobby Jones won it four times in eight years. The remarkable career and comeback of Ben Hogan was defined by the U.S. Open. He won his four titles in six years, including the year he couldn’t defend because he was recovering from near-fatal injuries after a head-on collision with a bus.

But there is no disputing who has cornered the market in silver.

Mickelson broke the U.S. Open record with his fifth runner-up finish in 2009 at Bethpage Black. There was a three-way tie for second that year with David Duval and Ricky Barnes, and the USGA had only one medal to present at the closing ceremony.

“I’ve got four of those,” Mickelson said. “I’m good.”

Sam Snead was a runner-up four times, and that doesn’t even include the 1939 U.S. Open in Philadelphia when he had a two-shot lead with two holes to play. He made bogey on the 17th and, not knowing the score, played the par-5 18th aggressively and took a triple bogey. Snead also lost in a playoff to Lew Worsham in 1947 at St. Louis when there was a dispute over who was away on the last hole. Worsham called for a measurement, Snead went first and missed a 3-footer to lose by one.

So maybe Mickelson has that going for him. He hasn’t lost in a U.S. Open playoff yet.

There’s still time, of course, and that’s the good news. The hunch _ the hope _ is that Mickelson will come back for one more shot, even if that means another kick in the gut for a guy who already has had the wind knocked out of him enough.

Don’t read too much into the golf course.

There’s a lot of chatter about the U.S. Open returning next year to Pinehurst No. 2, where Mickelson was runner-up for the first time in 1999 to Payne Stewart. But what about Pinehurst in 2005, when Lefty was 12 shots out of the lead in a tie for 33rd?

Also on the schedule are newcomers Chambers Bay and Erin Hills, along with Oakmont, Pebble Beach, Shinnecock Hills and Winged Foot, which will take Mickelson to his 50th birthday. His advancing age is a greater factor than where the U.S. Open is played. Because Mickelson can win _ and fail _ anywhere.

Despite his record six silver medals, the U.S. Open is the one major that Mickelson has had the most chances to win.

He plays the Masters consistently better, and he has won three green jackets, but Mickelson had only three other reasonable chances to win at Augusta National.

Story Continues →

View Entire Story

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Get Adobe Flash player