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Prosecutors file gag order against W.Va. boy suspended for NRA T-shirt

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Prosecutors on the case of an eighth-grade student who was suspended and arrested a couple weeks ago for refusing to take off his T-shirt with the NRA logo petitioned the court for an emergency gag order this week.

The prosecutors, Christopher White and Sabrina Deskins, said the defendant, 14-year-old Jared Marcum of Logan, W.Va., would be better served if the court clamped down on his and his father's ability to speak of the case to the media.

Jared's attorney called that argument odd, at best.

"We are here [in court today] because the prosecution filed a motion for a gag order," said attorney Ben White, to WOWK on Monday. "My opinion is because, seemingly, they want to take it out of the court of public opinion."

Jared's father, Allen Lardieri, agreed.

"It was for Jared's better interest is what I was told, which seems a bit odd to me," he said. "These are the same individuals trying to prosecute him, so as far as them knowing what is in his better interest, I have a lot of questions about that."

The state ultimately withdrew their petition for a gag order, The Daily Caller reported. But they first asked the judge to order Mr. Lardieri to agree that the prosecution could speak to the press about the case, also, The Daily Caller reported.

The case focuses on the arrest of Jared for obstructing a police officer. Jared wore a shirt to school that supported the National Rifle Association and was told to remove it by school administrators. He did not and when a police officer, James Adkins, was brought in to assist, Jared kept trying to give his side of the story, various media reported.

The officer alleged Jared was guilty of criminal obstruction and arrested him.

Jared faces a $500 fine and up to a year in detention.

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