Riley reflects on latest title, looks ahead

For now, Riley doesn’t sound like an advocate of that plan, saying he’ll leave the money decisions up to managing general partner Micky Arison and the rest of the Heat executive branch.

“He’s a great player,” Riley said. “So unless I get a mandate about (amnesty), we haven’t talked about it. We just want to keep this team together.”

Still, some changes will almost certainly happen.

The Heat had a two-day visit this past season with Greg Oden, the No. 1 overall pick in 2007 who has played exactly 82 games in his NBA career because of relentless knee issues. And with the Heat almost certainly not having the financial flexibility to get into the mix for big-money free agents, taking a flyer on someone like Oden might be the sort of move Miami makes this summer.

“We will explore that and see where it goes,” Riley said.

One guy who isn’t going anywhere, for now, is Riley himself.

With nine championships now and a Hall of Fame legacy as a coach, there is obviously nothing left for the son of Schenectady, N.Y. to prove in the NBA. But he remains driven by more, perked up Wednesday when talking about how he may have “I ain’t got no worries” _ a line James used after winning this title _ inscribed on the 2013 championship rings, and how the challenge of the next 12 months should energize the franchise.

If the Heat had lost Game 6 of the finals, he said major changes might have been forthcoming. But now, there’s no need for wholesale departures, and that applies to him as well.

“Why would I want to get off this train?” Riley said. “As long as Micky will have me, I will be here.”

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