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“It was a bit strange to see so many top players either lost or retired,” Djokovic said. “But grass is a very special surface. It requires a different kind of movement. … If grass at the start of Wimbledon is still not so used and, I guess, a little bit slippery, it can be dangerous, until you really get your right footing on the court. That’s probably the reason why they all felt uncomfortable and they all injured themselves, unfortunately.”

Djokovic himself took a tumble midway through his tight first set against Reynolds, a 30-year-old based in Atlanta, then quickly rose and whacked his heels with his racket. About 25 minutes later, Reynolds hit a 122 mph service winner to hold for 6-all, and the crowd roared, eager to see whether this guy they’d never heard of could continue to push Djokovic, who is ranked No. 1 and owns six major titles, including at Wimbledon in 2011.

But from there, it wasn’t close. Reynolds missed two forehands early in the tiebreaker, helping Djokovic take a 5-0 lead before ending the set with a 117 mph ace.

“He just puts so much pressure on you, point after point after point,” Reynolds said. “He moves unbelievably well. … You think you hit a good shot, but he’s right there, crushing it back at you.”

Reynolds was, in many ways, simply happy to be there, on his sport’s most famous court, facing one of its best players.

“You can’t put a price tag on it,” said Reynolds, who went five years between Grand Slam match wins. “I’ll keep so many memories from that match. I loved it. Once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.”

One shot Reynolds most definitely will recall, ruefully, came while leading 1-0 in the second set. Up love-30 on Djokovic’s serve, Reynolds lost track of the ball and sent an overhead long.

“It went in between the rafters, and then you see it, and then it hits the piping, and then it comes back out. I just mistimed it,” said Reynolds, who never had break points, while Djokovic converted 4 of 18. “I guess it’s lack of being in there, the surroundings.”

And so, at 7:43 p.m. local time, Djokovic deposited a backhand volley winner, the last shot hit against a U.S. man at Wimbledon this year.

With 27 of 32 third-round spots in men’s singles settled, 18 countries are represented, including Latvia, Ukraine, Croatia and South Africa. Five countries have multiple entrants left, led by four each for Spain and France.

“I’m looking just to see if I can get to the next round. That’s basically what it is. I don’t feel like I’m carrying the U.S. flag (or) ‘I’m the lone guy left,’” Reynolds said. “I actually wasn’t aware of it at all.”

American men have won Wimbledon more than 30 times. Maurice McLoughlin did it in 1913, followed by Tilden in 1920, then Budge and Bobby Riggs in the 1930s, all the way through to players such as Connors, McEnroe and Arthur Ashe in the 1970s and 1980s.

During the nine-tournament stretch from 1992 to 2000, a U.S. man won Wimbledon eight times (seven for Sampras, one for Agassi), and there was at least one — and sometimes two — in the final each year. More recently, Andy Roddick reached three finals from 2004-09, losing to Federer every time.

As it is, American men are going through their longest drought without a Grand Slam champion anywhere; this year’s U.S. Open will mark exactly a decade since Roddick won the title there. That, at least, can be partly explained by this: Switzerland’s Federer, Spain’s Rafael Nadal and Serbia’s Djokovic collected 31 of the last 33 major trophies.

But what happened at Wimbledon this week shows U.S. problems extend far below the top tier.

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