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Lear noted that despite tackling some serious subjects in her work, Franklin always stayed cheery and positive.

“I was wrong _ I thought life forces never die. Bonnie was such a life force,” Lear said in a statement. “Bubbly, always up, the smile never left her face.”

Franklin herself was married for 29 years. Her husband, TV producer Marvin Minoff, died in 2009.

Born Bonnie Gail Franklin in Santa Monica, Calif., she entered show business at an early age. She was a child tap dancer and actress, and a protege of Donald O’Connor, with whom she performed in the 1950s on NBC’s “Colgate Comedy Hour.”

A decade later, she was appearing on such episodic programs as “Mr. Novak,” “Gidget” and “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.”

On stage, Franklin was in the original Broadway production of “Applause,” for which she received a 1970 Tony Award nomination, and other plays including “Dames at Sea” and “A Thousand Clowns.”

Franklin’s recent credits include appearances on “The Young and the Restless” and the TV Land comedy “Hot in Cleveland,” which again reunited her with Bertinelli, one of that show’s regulars.

Franklin was a “devoted mother, grandmother, daughter, sister, aunt and friend,” her family said in a statement. She also was a longtime activist for a range of charities and civic-oriented issues, among them AIDS care and research and the Stroke Association of Southern California.

In 2001, she and her sister Judy Bush founded the nonprofit Classic and Contemporary American Plays, an organization that introduces great American plays to inner-city schools’ curriculum.

A private memorial will be held next week, her family said.