Inside the Beltway: Obama’s elusive victory

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(Bumper sticker spotted in Plano, Texas)

PALMETTO POLITICS

Palmetto State politics continue to be complex. Boisterous rivals like Teddy Turner and former Gov. Mark Sanford vie to fill the shoes of Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina, the former representative appointed to his current office after Jim DeMint left to become president of the Heritage Foundation. Meanwhile, Sen. Lindsey Graham has an unexpected challenger.

That would be Bruce Carroll, co-founder of GOProud, the gay Republican group barred from the upcoming Conservative Political Action Conference at week’s end. The 4-year-old organization has allies among those who insist the party needs help against Democrats from all sectors, gay or otherwise.

Mr. Carroll has resigned his post and likely intends to run against Mr. Graham.

“In the spirit of transparency and honesty, I informed my fellow GOProud board members that I could not dedicate the time to the organization while I seriously considered the effort it will take to challenge Sen. Graham in the 2014 primary,” he says in an open letter. Mr. Carroll has already changed his Twitter biography to indicate he’s the “future junior senator” for South Carolina.

“If I believe I could provide a serious alternative to Senator Graham for the voters of South Carolina, and I can find the financial and moral support to join me in that effort, then I will take those next formal steps needed to do so,” he says. “Someone needs to be the conscience of South Carolina’s voters.”

POLL DU JOUR

• 85 percent of Americans say working at home balances employment and family needs

• 84 percent say an office setting adds to “team camaraderie”; 83 percent say good ideas result from in-person meetings at the office.

• 83 percent say an option to work at home is a “significant job perk.”

• 66 percent currently do not work at home; 64 percent say working at home would increase productivity.

• 61 percent say the option to telecommute would influence their decision to take a job, or remain on a job.

• 35 percent say working at home “hurts speed and work quality.”

Source: A Harris Poll of 2,219 U.S. adults conduced Feb. 28 to March 4.

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