- The Washington Times - Tuesday, March 26, 2013

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

I know there is a tendency by conservatives to pile on President Obama and constantly criticize his spending policies, so I am offering a constructive suggestion instead. The president should stop using nuanced phrases such as “balanced approach” when it comes to the budget discussions.

Americans are savvy enough to understand what the term “balance” means, but when the word is used in a phrase that is very generalized and broad, it loses its meaning. His approach is anything but balanced. Rather it is heavily slanted toward revenue collection and spending rather than spending reductions that would begin to reduce our debt. Mr. Obama is attempting to persuade the public that there needs to be more revenue collection in the form of increased taxes to support the spending he is pursuing for programs such as health care. Let’s face it, with a huge price tag for this program, there has to be substantial revenue collected to fund it.

In addition to the numerous taxes embedded in the thousands of pages that constitute Obamacare, the Senate moved recently toward approving its first budget in four years, in which it promised nearly $1 trillion of tax increases on top of more than $600 billion in higher taxes enacted in January. Although most conservatives, myself included, understand this nuance, the president’s position would be better served if he was more forthright with the folks beyond the Beltway and simply leveled with everyone about the real meaning of “balanced approach.” If he was true to his word, he would characterize his position as a very “unbalanced approach” — but of course this would be totally counter to his ultimate objective of collecting enough revenue to fund a very exorbitant agenda.

At the end of the day, I guess I’m just preaching to the wrong choir. Unfortunately, that choir has become woefully tone-deaf.

ROB WEINHOLD

Dale City, Va.

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