TV violence increasing, growing darker post-Newtown, study finds

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“Networks are out to make money and will do whatever it takes to make money,” Dr. Strasburger said. “When the public health of children comes into conflict with big money, big money always wins.”

May represents a turning point for networks, which announce their fall schedules to advertisers in a couple of weeks. The four biggest networks ordered pilots for 44 prospective dramas that they are considering airing sometime in the next season.

Some of them suggest the same issues will persist. Two of ABC’s pilots are “Killer Women” and “Murder in Manhattan.” Fox is considering series about a family of assassins working for the U.S. government, about a gang member infiltrating a police force and about a person systematically murdering people in the federal witness protection program.

CBS, which already has a lineup heavy on police procedurals, has ordered “Anatomy of Violence,” about a psychologist with expertise on sociopaths. NBC’s “The Blacklist” is about the world’s most wanted criminal, and “Hatfields & McCoys” updates the legendary family feud in a modern setting.

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