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The lawsuit lodges six counts against the NCAA, Emmert and Ray, including breach of contract, civil conspiracy, defamation and commercial disparagement, according to Sollers‘ statement.

Sollers, in an interview Wednesday with The Associated Press, said the suit would ask for the sanctions and agreement between school and the NCAA to be deemed unlawful and the penalties overturned.

The lawsuit also would ask for unspecified damages and court costs, Sollers said, though the family would donate any net proceeds to charity.

“The broader goal is to get the truth out,” Sollers told the AP. “This narrative that’s in public that was perpetuated by the NCAA’s adoption of the deeply flawed Freeh report … cannot stand.”

The NCAA said Wednesday it had not received any such lawsuit and could not comment.

“Despite our request, the Paterno family has not shared any information about its planned legal action,” chief legal officer Donald Remy said in a statement. “We remain committed to working with Penn State toward the continued successful completion of our voluntary agreement with the university and to working” with the NCAA’s independent monitor, former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell.

Penn State spokesman Dave La Torre said the school was not a party to any litigation that might be filed by the Paterno family and remained committed to “full compliance” to the sanctions.

“We look forward to continuing to work with Sen. George Mitchell and recognize the important role that intercollegiate athletics provides for our student athletes and the wider university community,” the statement from La Torre said.

Sollers said Freeh is not named as a defendant in the case, but is listed as a “co-conspirator” in the lawsuit, and that there were close communications between the NCAA and Freeh’s team throughout the investigation.

The Associated Press left a message seeking comment Wednesday for a spokesman for Freeh.

Costas said Freeh and Emmert declined to appear on his show.

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Online:

http://progress.psu.edu/the-freeh-report