You are currently viewing the printable version of this article, to return to the normal page, please click here.

The Wrap: From RG3 bashing political correctness to Eric Holder’s Kansas problem, the week that was

  • Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III (10) celebrates after the Washington Redskins defeat the New York Giants 17-16 on Monday Night Football at FedEx Field, Landover, Md., Dec. 3, 2012. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III (10) celebrates after the Washington Redskins defeat the New York Giants 17-16 on Monday Night Football at FedEx Field, Landover, Md., Dec. 3, 2012. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Credit: U.S. Marine CorpsCredit: U.S. Marine Corps
  • ** FILE ** Runner Bob Leonard captured pictures of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects on April 15, 2013, in Boston. Tamerlan Tsarnaev (third from left), who was dubbed Suspect No. 1, and his brother, Dzhokhar  Tsarnaev, who was dubbed Suspect No. 2 by law enforcement, are pictured approximately 10 to 20 minutes before the blasts. (AP Photo/Bob Leonard)** FILE ** Runner Bob Leonard captured pictures of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects on April 15, 2013, in Boston. Tamerlan Tsarnaev (third from left), who was dubbed Suspect No. 1, and his brother, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was dubbed Suspect No. 2 by law enforcement, are pictured approximately 10 to 20 minutes before the blasts. (AP Photo/Bob Leonard)
  • In a Friday, Sept. 28, 2012 file photo, Boston Celtics' Jason Collins poses during Celtics NBA basketball media day at the team's training facility in Waltham, Mass. NBA veteran center Collins has become the first male professional athlete in the major four American sports leagues to come out as gay. Collins wrote a first-person account posted Monday, April 29, 2013 on Sports Illustrated's website. He finished this past season with the Washington Wizards and is now a free agent. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)In a Friday, Sept. 28, 2012 file photo, Boston Celtics' Jason Collins poses during Celtics NBA basketball media day at the team's training facility in Waltham, Mass. NBA veteran center Collins has become the first male professional athlete in the major four American sports leagues to come out as gay. Collins wrote a first-person account posted Monday, April 29, 2013 on Sports Illustrated's website. He finished this past season with the Washington Wizards and is now a free agent. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
  • Former Alaska governor Sarah Palin speaks during the final day of the 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference in Fort Washington, Md. on March 16, 2013. (T.J. Kirkpatrick/Special to The Washington Times)Former Alaska governor Sarah Palin speaks during the final day of the 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference in Fort Washington, Md. on March 16, 2013. (T.J. Kirkpatrick/Special to The Washington Times)
  • Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. said Monday that the decision to kill a U.S. citizen living abroad who poses a terrorist threat "is among the gravest that government leaders can face," but justified the action as legal and sometimes necessary in the war on terrorism. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. said Monday that the decision to kill a U.S. citizen living abroad who poses a terrorist threat "is among the gravest that government leaders can face," but justified the action as legal and sometimes necessary in the war on terrorism.
  • ** FILE ** This undated photo added on April 18, 2013, to the VK page of Dias Kadyrbayev shows, from left, Azamat Tazhayakov and Dias Kadyrbayev, from Kazakhstan, with Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in Times Square in New York. (AP Photo/VK)** FILE ** This undated photo added on April 18, 2013, to the VK page of Dias Kadyrbayev shows, from left, Azamat Tazhayakov and Dias Kadyrbayev, from Kazakhstan, with Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in Times Square in New York. (AP Photo/VK)
  • In a transfer-of-remains ceremony at Andrews Air Force Base on Sept. 14, carry teams brought home the remains of the four Americans killed in an attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya. Family members say they still don’t know exactly how their loved ones died. (Associated Press)
  • ** FILE ** Russian President Vladimir (Associated Press)** FILE ** Russian President Vladimir (Associated Press)
  • **FILE** The 2005-2006 Federal Junior Duck Stamp, designed by Kerissa Nelson, 17, of Grantsburg, Wis., is displayed on Capitol Hill in Washington on June 30, 2005, during the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's first day of sale ceremony. (Associated Press)**FILE** The 2005-2006 Federal Junior Duck Stamp, designed by Kerissa Nelson, 17, of Grantsburg, Wis., is displayed on Capitol Hill in Washington on June 30, 2005, during the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's first day of sale ceremony. (Associated Press)
Question of the Day

Should Congress make English the official language of the U.S.?

View results

Americans learned that the Boston bombers initially wanted to launch their terror attack on Independence Day, and the Obama administration found itself on the defensive once again over accusations of a Benghazi cover-up.

On the international stage, Russia’s strategic nuclear forces are undergoing a major modernization — while the U.S. scales back.

Here's a recap, or wrap, on the week that was from The Washington Times.

• Republicans say U.S. headed toward ‘armed revolution’: Poll

A survey of Republicans found nearly half agreed that “an armed revolution in order to protect liberties might be necessary in the next few years.” The poll, from Farleigh Dickinson University’s Public Mind, surveyed a random sampling of 863 registered voters and had a margin of error of plus-minus 3.4 percentage points.

• RG3 decries ‘tyranny of political correctness’

Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III took to Twitter to espouse his views of political correctness, describing an America that’s well on its way to tyranny.

“In a land of freedom we are held hostage by the tyranny of political correctness,” he tweeted.

• Top brass crush career of Army officer who warned of jihadists

The Pentagon’s top brass has dealt another blow to a decorated Army officer who was fired last year as a war college instructor because of his teachings about radical Islam, his attorney told The Washington Times.

A four-star general’s rejection of Lt. Col. Matthew Dooley for consideration for command of a combat battalion likely means the end of a promising Army career of an armor officer who was decorated for valor in Iraq and received glowing evaluations.

• ESPN apologizes for Chris Broussard's conservative Christian views of homosexuality

ESPN has been pushed to apologize for conservative Christian views expressed by NBA analyst Chris Broussard, who stated a biblical view of homosexuality during a segment about the coming out of free agent Jason Collins.

During an "Outside the Lines" appearance on Mr. Collins — who said earlier this week he was gay — Mr. Broussard was asked by the host about the readiness of the NBA to deal with an openly homosexual player.

• Senator Sarah Palin? Tea party sees gains from Obamacare

Prominent tea party members are preparing for big wins in 2014 due to negative fallout from President Obama’s signature health care reform.

Now that Democratic Party leaders, along with White House officials, are predicting some glitches in Obamacare implementation, 2014 elections are shaping in conservatives’ favor — and tea partiers are hoping to capitalize, United Press International reported. GOPers are eyeing the Senate, especially, as a possible gold mine.

• Pentagon: Soldiers who spread faith may be prosecuted

Soldiers who promote their faith can be prosecuted under military law, the Pentagon said in a brief statement released to the media.

“Religious proselytization is not permitted within the Department of Defense,” the statement to Fox News stated. “Court martials and non-judicial punishments are decided on a case-by-case basis.”

• White House denies any Benghazi muzzling; hearings planned to probe cover-up

The White House denied Wednesday that State Department officials are muzzling would-be whistleblowers about last year’s terrorist attacks on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi by blocking security clearances for their attorneys.

“These allegations are part of an unfortunate pattern of spreading misinformation and politicizing this issue,” White House press secretary Jay Carney said.

• Three charged with trying to thwart Boston bomb investigation, were pals of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

Authorities arrested three more suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing case on charges that they removed suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s backpack and laptop from his dorm room three days after the April 15 attack in a bid to frustrate the investigation.

Azamat Tazhayakov and Dias Kadyrbayev of Kazakhstan were charged with conspiring to obstruct justice. A third man, Robel Phillipos, of Cambridge, Mass., was charged with knowingly making false statements to federal investigators during a terrorism investigation.

• Eric Holder to Kansas governor: New state gun law unconstitutional

A new law in Kansas that prevents government agents from enforcing federal gun laws in the state is unconstitutional, Attorney General Eric H. Holder said.

“In purporting to override federal law and to criminalize the official acts of federal officers, [the law] directly conflicts with federal law and is therefore unconstitutional,” Mr. Holder wrote to Gov. Sam Brownback in a letter dated April 26. “Federal officers who are responsible for enforcing federal laws and regulations in order to maintain public safety cannot be forced to choose between the risk of a criminal prosecution by a state and the continued performance of their federal duties.”

• Boston bombers originally planned Fourth of July attack

Federal investigators revealed that the Boston bombers initially wanted to launch their terror attack on Independence Day, but changed to the marathon because they finished building their bombs faster than they thought they could.

• Inside the Ring: Russia builds up, U.S. down

As the Obama administration prepares to launch a new round of strategic nuclear missile cuts, Russia’s strategic nuclear forces are undergoing a major modernization, according to U.S. officials.

• Duck and cover: Feds reinstate ‘duck stamp’ crown to 6-year-old

The federal government late Thursday reinstated the 6-year-old winner of this year’s Junior Duck Stamp, after earlier accusing her of plagiarism and rescinding her award.

In a statement issued Thursday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reversed itself and said that last month’s judging was fair and that Madison Grimm, the youngest winner in history, should be reinstated.

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks