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“That’s the one that hurts,” Montgomerie said of Winged Foot, noting another Hall of Fame member, Phil Mickelson, also made double bogey on the 18th. “The four or five others, really, somebody happened to beat me. The 2006 Winged Foot, I beat myself. And that’s where it hurts most. So that has taken the most to recover from.”

Montgomerie is the fourth player in the last four years to be inducted into the Hall of Fame without having won a major. The others were Jumbo Ozaki, Jock Hutchison and Christy O’Connor Sr. A fifth would be Peter Alliss, who won 23 times on the European Tour, though he was recognized more for his work with the BBC.

“I’ve enjoyed thoroughly my exploits in major championships,” Montgomerie said. “I just haven’t been fortunate, or whatever it takes. I’ve never, ever stood up and made a winner’s speech and said I was unlucky. Never. I never will. There’s always a time where a bit of fortunate comes your way, whether it be for you or against your opponent at the time, and it just so happens that I just haven’t been so-called fortunate to walk through the door. The door has been ajar many a time. I just haven’t been able to walk through it.

“So at the same time, if you’re talking about regrets of any part of my golfing career, I have none. Absolutely none,” he said. “I’ve done exactly what I’ve tried to do. I’ve tried 100 percent on every shot, and sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t.”

Montgomerie also received 51 percent of the vote on the International ballot.

Venturi was a premier amateur out of San Francisco, leading the 1956 Masters until an 80 in the final round. Venturi captured the 1964 U.S. Open at Congressional, in such stifling heat that he suffered from severe dehydration and nearly collapsed before he finished. When carpal tunnel syndrome ended his career, he moved to the broadcast booth and enjoyed 35 years of distinguished service to CBS Sports.

Venturi later became Presidents Cup captain in 2000.

He has been hospitalized in Palm Springs, Calif., for the last two months and could not attend the ceremony. Nantz accepted on his behalf, and then brought out on Venturi’s two sons, Matt and Tim, saying, “We need to put the crystal in the hands of the Venturi family. We need the fingerprints on the crystal.”

Schofield, also selected through Lifetime Achievement, was head of the European Tour from 1975 to 2004. He rode the presence of Europe’s “Big Five” _ Seve Ballesteros, Nick Faldo, Bernhard Langer, Sandy Lyle and Ian Woosnam _ to get the tour onto a global stage. The tour went from 17 events when he started to 45 events when he retired. He also paved the way for the tour to go beyond continental Europe, and to include the continent in the Ryder Cup.

Park joins his father in the Hall of Fame, and the son probably should have been enshrined already. He won the British Open in 1887 and 1889, and then broadened his influence on golf by building clubs, golf courses and writing. His book in 1896, “The Game of Golf,” was the first written by a golf professional. He later wrote “The Art of Putting” that was published in 1920.

Among the golf courses he built were the Old Course at Sunningdale outside London, Maidstone on Long Island in New York and Olympia Fields outside Chicago.