- The Washington Times - Wednesday, May 8, 2013

When our high school freshman recently began tackling Homer’s “The Odyssey,” something struck me about the Senate’s “Gang of Eight” amnesty legislation.

For centuries, scholars and students have studied the nuances of “The Odyssey.” Countless books have been written about the epic poem, and discussion and debate continue unabated to this day. Conversely, the current amnesty legislation is twice as long, with indisputably greater implications fraught with unintended consequences. And at 844 pages the legislation will be a document unread in its entirety by those who will try to force its imposition.

Where is the debate and discussion? Or should we simply rely on the paragons of intellectual firepower in Congress? I think not. To wit, in March 2010, Rep. Henry C. “Hank” Johnson Jr., Georgia Democrat, stated that Guam could tip over as a result of an increase in U.S. naval forces. Last month, Rep. Barbara Lee, California Democrat, introduced legislation claiming that global warming increases prostitution. And the most inane, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, California Democrat, said “Obamacare” had to be passed in order for us to see what was in it. I’m not implying that Democrats have a monopoly on simple-mindedness, but it seems to me that immigration reform requires far more of an Odyssean understanding than any proposal predicated upon Democrats’ inability to rise above the intellectual level of “The Cat in the Hat.”

On immigration, therefore, I’d propose a series of one-page pieces of legislation, the first of which would be on securing the border. Once border security is deemed successful, subsequent one-pagers would each address issues such as E-Verify enforcement, sanctuary-city elimination and so on. These would be simple steps to solve complex problems.

Even Dr. Seuss would be proud.

DAN WILSON

Stafford, Va.