Toronto’s Happ ‘responsive’ after head injury

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Several pitchers around the majors sounded resistant _ even after seeing replays of Happ’s injury.

“You know the risks,” Angels lefty C.J. Wilson said. “Guys get hurt crashing into fences. Guys get hurt tripping over first base and blowing their knee out. This is professional sports, and we are paid well to take those risks.”

MLB could implement the safety change in the minor leagues, as it did a few seasons ago with augmented batting helmets, but would require the approval of the players’ union to make big leaguers wear them.

Colorado Rockies left-hander Jorge De La Rosa said if a helmet or liner is developed for pitchers, he’d gladly wear one.

“It wouldn’t be hard for me,” De La Rosa said. “To protect against those kinds of things, it’s good for us.”

Cincinnati Reds pitcher Homer Bailey doesn’t like the idea of wearing protective headgear.

“The game’s been played a long time. Situations like that are unfortunate, but we have to keep it our game,” he said. “I don’t think you have to adjust the whole program.”

And Seattle Mariners right-hander Aaron Harang thinks it would be difficult for veteran major league pitchers to adapt to new equipment.

“I know it’s a hot topic,” he said, “but I don’t think it’s a problem that’s easily solved. I know a lot of people want pitchers to start wearing helmets. It’s a good idea in theory, but I don’t know how practical it is. I think you need to start with that at the lower level, I’m talking high school and maybe even lower, and then gradually introduce it into the higher level. I’ve been pitching since I was 6 years old and I’ve never worn a helmet. I think it would be tough to make that adjustment while pitching in a major league game.”

Texas Rangers manager Ron Washington wondered if there’s a viable solution.

“What can you do?” he said. “Tell hitters not to hit it back up the middle?”

Oakland right-hander Brandon McCarthy was hit in the head by a line drive last September, causing a skull fracture, an epidural hemorrhage and a brain contusion that required surgery. He was released from the hospital six days later.

McCarthy, who pitched for Arizona on Tuesday night against the Los Angeles Dodgers, said he won’t watch video of Happ getting hit.

“I don’t know what the GMs and the owners have to do with anything. It’s not like they’re pitching,” McCarthy said. “Until someone makes something that works, it’s going to be tough for someone to wear it.

“Most everything that’s come out wouldn’t have protected me, and it wouldn’t have protected (Happ) if he got hit directly in the ear. You’re at a point now where you’re looking at batting helmets. You’d have to have something that protected the ear and then the face and beyond. So it’s kind of a slippery slope. Someone will have to come up with something really good and really sound. Otherwise, I don’t know how you answer that question.”

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