Hit by liner, Happ says ‘I feel really fortunate’

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Green said an average of two pitchers had been struck on the head by line drives during the past seven or eight seasons.

“While these things are catastrophic, they’re still rare events,” he said.

Baseball stepped up its efforts after two pitchers were struck last year. Oakland’s Brandon McCarthy was hit on the head by a liner last September, causing a skull fracture, an epidural hemorrhage and a brain contusion that required surgery. He was released from a hospital six days later.

Detroit’s Doug Fister was struck in the head by a batted ball during the World Series; he was unhurt and stayed in the game.

“I’ve heard a lot of pitchers say they wouldn’t mind trying it. And a lot of pitchers just don’t want it,” said Tampa Bay’s David Price, the reigning AL Cy Young Award winner. “So I think the decision would still be left up to that player. If it worked and it didn’t affect anything in the mound, I would definitely look into it.”

When a product is available that MLB thinks will provide protection without getting in the way, it will ask the players’ association for its input.

“I guess you’d have to see some prototypes,” Happ said. “It would be tough.”

In the macho culture of baseball, the adoption of protective gear has been slow. While Cleveland’s Ray Chapman died when he was hit by a pitch in 1920, MLB didn’t make the use of helmets or protective cap inserts mandatory until the National League required them for the 1956 season. Helmets weren’t required until the 1971 season and, even then, they weren’t mandatory for players already in the big leagues.

An earflap on the side of the head facing the pitcher was required for new players starting in 1983. Stronger and slightly heavier carbon-fiber helmets, the Rawlings S100 Pro Comp, were required starting this year.

“You can’t ask a pitcher to use material that he’s not comfortable with. But I’m hopeful that, much like with batting helmets, we’ll figure something out that both allows the players to play without any obstruction but adds to player safety,” union head Michael Weiner said. “When they get close to something that they think might work, then at that point we’re both going to look at it together.”

Bryce Florie doesn’t see well in his right eye to this day, the result of being struck by a line drive hit by the Yankees’ Ryan Thompson while pitching for Boston in September 2000. Florie returned the following year but ended his career after just seven more big league appearances.

“With the way everything is being condensed, I think it’s inevitable that it’s going to happen, that they’re going to have something in the hat,” Florie said. “You’ll have a hard time to get major leaguers and minor leaguers to say, `OK, Let me try this out.’ Most of them are not going to want to be the first guy. But if you talk to guys like myself and other guys that have been hit, up in the face, in the head, we’ll be, `Like yeah, I’ll do it.’ But then, it’s kind of late.”

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Goodall reported from St. Petersburg, Fla., and Blum from New York

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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