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Derek Schiller, the team’s executive vice president of sales and marketing, said the Cobb Marietta Coliseum and Exhibit Hall Authority will own the new stadium, with construction scheduled to begin next summer. The team would be responsible for any cost overruns, and Schiller said other financial details would be released soon.

The Braves immediately launched a website that said the new stadium would be closer to the geographic center of the team’s fan base. Also, Census data shows the team is moving to a much more prosperous area, with a median household income of about $61,000 and a poverty level of 8.6 percent, compared to $23,000 and nearly 40 percent for the neighborhood surrounding Turner Field.

Bucking the trend of pro teams seeking stadiums and arenas closer to the city center, the Braves‘ new facility will be part of a 60-acre development near Cobb Galleria mall. Plant compared it to new ballparks in Cincinnati, San Diego and Houston, as well as L.A. Live, which hosts the NBA’s Los Angeles Lakers and Clippers and the NHL’s Kings at Staples Center.

“With our current location, we couldn’t control that process,” Plant said. “This site allows us to do that.”

Turner Field opened as the 85,000-seat main stadium for the 1996 Olympics, hosting athletics as well as the opening and closing ceremonies.

After the Olympics, the stadium was renamed after former Braves owner Ted Turner, downsized to about 50,000 seats and converted to a baseball park for the 1997 season, replacing Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium across the street. The old stadium was imploded and turned into a parking lot for the new facility, just a week after the city’s Omni coliseum met the same fate.

As Turner Field, the park hosted the 1999 World Series, 2000 All-Star game and four National League championship series.

Commissioner Bud Selig said he was kept informed of the negotiations and endorsed the team’s decision, even though Turner Field is newer than 13 of Major League Baseball’s other 29 stadiums and would certainly be an upgrade over facilities in Oakland and Tampa Bay, which have tried for years to build new parks without success.

“Maybe they can put the old one on wheels and send it to Tampa,” joked Sandy Alderson, general manager of the NL East rival New York Mets.

Others around baseball were surprised by the announcement.

“That one came out of nowhere,” said New York Yankees GM Brian Cashman.

Reed said he’s already been in discussions with several organizations about redeveloping the entire Turner Field corridor after the Braves complete their 20-year lease in 2016.

The Falcons are also scheduled to move into their new stadium in 2017, a downtown facility that will be built next door to the Georgia Dome. The old stadium will be leveled after its replacement opens.

It appears Turner Field is headed for the same fate.

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