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“We’re sticking to the schedule,” he said. “We’ll be fine.”

As tackle Tyson Clabo noted, the Dolphins are 2-1 since Martin left the team and the scandal began to unfold. Eight wins might be enough to make the playoffs in the parity-filled AFC, and the Dolphins are tied with the Jets in the race for the sixth and final playoff spot.

The teams play each other Dec. 1 and Dec. 29.

The Dolphins are at .500 even though they’ve been outgained by 571 yards this year, and they were hardly dominant against the Chargers, who totaled 435 yards but scored only one touchdown.

Miami won despite missing 60 percent of its offensive line, including center Mike Pouncey, who was out sick. Replacements included undrafted rookie Sam Brenner, who won praise from teammates in his NFL debut.

The victory inspired an emotional postgame locker-room pep talk by the stoic Philbin.

“The focus and the resiliency of you guys, all right, this week amid all that’s going on — unbelievable,” Philbin shouted. “Fantastic job by you guys hanging tough, sticking together and working at your job, being a pro, coming to work every day regardless of the circumstances.”

Receiver Mike Wallace conceded the game seemed like a refuge amid the recent media scrutiny.

“This is one of the only things we have to escape everything else — to just go out and play a football game,” Wallace said. “Any time you can get a win it makes everyone around you feel good, and even the people who are not around you.”

That might include the two fans sitting side by side Sunday who wore brown bags over their heads, one bearing a photo of Incognito, the other a photo of Martin.

Martin, a second-year pro from Stanford, has been with family in California undergoing counseling for emotional issues. He attended Stanford’s game Saturday at Southern Cal, watching from the sideline.

Incognito filed a grievance last week against the Dolphins seeking to rejoin the team.

Revelations about their relationship struck a national nerve on the issue of locker-room bullying, and have even gone global. Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Joe Montana offered a reaction Monday from the Great Wall of China, where he was on a tour to promote football.

Montana said bullying was common in the NFL, and said the locker room is a “fun, crazy place,” but added, “It’s a tough place, too, sometimes.”