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It’s unclear how many individual plans are being canceled — no one agency keeps track. But it’s likely in the millions. Insurance industry experts estimate that about 14 million people, or 5 percent of the total market for health care coverage, buy individual policies. Most people get coverage through jobs and aren’t affected.

Many states require insurers to give consumers 90 days’ notice before canceling plans. That means another round of cancellation letters will go out in March and again in May.

Experts haven’t been able to predict how many will pay more or less under the new, upgraded plans. An older policyholder with a pre-existing condition may find that premiums go down, and some will qualify for subsidies.

In California, about 900,000 people are expected to lose existing plans, but about a third will be eligible for subsidies through the state exchange, said Anne Gonzalez, a spokeswoman for the exchange, called Covered California. Most canceled plans provided bare-bones coverage, she said.

“They basically had plans that had gaping holes in the coverage. They would be surprised when they get to the emergency room or the doctor’s office, some of them didn’t have drug coverage or preventive care,” Gonzalez said.

About 330,000 Floridians received cancellation notices from the state’s largest insurer, Florida Blue. About 30,000 have plans that were grandfathered in. Florida insurance officials said they’re not tracking the number of canceled policies related to the new law.

National numbers are similar: 130,000 cancellations in Kentucky, 140,000 in Minnesota and as many as 400,000 in Georgia, according to officials in those states.

Cigna has sent thousands of cancellation letters to U.S. policyholders but stressed that 99 percent have the option of renewing their 2013 policy for one more year, company spokesman Joe Mondy said.

Cancellation letters are being sent only to individuals and families who purchase their own insurance. However, most policyholders in the individual market will receive some notice that their coverage will change, said Dan Mendelson, president of the market analysis firm Avalere Health.

The cancellations run counter to one of President Barack Obama’s promises about his health care overhaul: “If you like your health care plan, you’ll be able to keep your health care plan.”

Philip Johnson, 47, of Boise, Idaho, was shocked when his cancellation notice arrived last month. The gift-shop owner said he’d spent years arranging doctors covered by his insurer for him, his wife and their two college-age students.

After browsing the state exchange, he said he thinks he’ll end up paying lower premiums but higher deductibles. He said the website didn’t answer many of his questions, such as which doctors take which plans.

“I was furious because I spent a lot of time and picked a plan that all my doctors accepted,” Johnson said. “Now I don’t know what doctors are going to take what. No one mentioned that for the last three years when they talked about how this was going to work.”

Associated Press writers Christina A. Cassidy in Atlanta; Rachel La Corte in Olympia, Wash.; Marc Levy in Harrisburg, Pa.; Tom Murphy in Indianapolis; Juliet Williams in Sacramento, Calif.; and Kristen Wyatt in Denver contributed to this report.