FANTASY GRIND: Bold moves, ESPN injury expert Bell

continued from page 1

It’s a conversation every year: Who are the biggest breakouts and busts? There are many ways to measure, and here’s another: The following players are owned the most often on last-place teams in CBS Sports leagues.

QB: Tom Brady, New England; Colin Kaepernick, San Francisco. Some people believe Brady is on the upswing after throwing for 296 yards and a touchdown Monday night against Carolina. Kaepernick’s rushing numbers aren’t enough to make up for his low passing totals. There are 15 quarterbacks who have more total points in standard leagues that tally four points per touchdown passing.

RB: C.J. Spiller, Buffalo; Trent Richardson, Indianapolis; Ray Rice, Baltimore; Steven Jackson, Atlanta; Maurice Jones-Drew, Jacksonville. All five players were taken on average in the first two rounds of fantasy drafts this year.

WR: Roddy White, Atlanta; Marques Colston, New Orleans; Hakeem Nicks, New York Giants; Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona; Steve Smith, Carolina. It’s probably not hard to guess that Fitzgerald has been the most productive of this group this year. But 20 receivers have been even better, including Riley Cooper and Jerricho Cotchery.

No tight ends made CBS’s top 12 list of players most often on last-place teams. But as a bonus, here’s a list of the players most often on first-place teams:

QB: Peyton Manning, Denver; Matthew Stafford, Detroit.

RB: LeSean McCoy, Philadelphia; Jamaal Charles, Kansas City; Matt Forte, Chicago; Marshawn Lynch, Seattle; Knowshon Moreno, Denver.

WR: Calvin Johnson, Detroit; DeSean Jackson, Philadelphia; Jordy Nelson, Green Bay; Demaryius Thomas, Denver.

TE: Jimmy Graham, New Orleans.

___

RINGER TIME: STEPHANIA BELL

ESPN’s injury expert, Stephania Bell, doesn’t think it’s a sure thing that the NFL is seeing more injuries this season than in years past, though she’s kept plenty busy and fantasy owners certainly seem to believe it’s the case.

“Somehow I hear people say that every year. Is every year the worst we’ve ever seen? It’s a fascinating question,” said Bell, a licensed physical therapist who has a practice in California and analyzes injuries for ESPN (http://es.pn/16d6Odh).

“I, for one, would be reluctant to throw that out,” she said.

But Bell says NFL teams are approaching injuries differently in terms of how they’re handled and reported. And while it might be easy for fans to point to rules governing hits, concussions and the league’s collective bargaining agreement, spikes or dips are possible in any given season, making it hard to judge even one year in isolation, she said.

Story Continues →

View Entire Story

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Get Adobe Flash player