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Cobb business owner and resident John Loud urge the commission to vote right away to cement the deal because Fulton County is “just waiting to watch us stumble.”

The vote came amid calls by a diverse coalition of citizen groups for more time. Leaders of the Atlanta Tea Party, Common Cause of Georgia and the Sierra Club, among others, had asked for a 60-day delay, saying voters in the suburban county haven’t had enough time to consider details of the project.

“I’ve been very disappointed in the veil of secrecy and the rush” to vote on the deal, Cobb resident Kevin Daniels said. “It’s not characteristic of the government I’ve grown accustomed to having here in Cobb County.”

Terry Taylor, with Common Cause Georgia, said he isn’t necessarily opposed to having the stadium in Cobb County or even to using public funds. But he said the vote was very rushed and called for a public referendum.

“The scope and scale of this project demands that there be public participation,” he said.

The memorandum of understanding between the county, the Cobb-Marietta Coliseum Exhibit Hall Authority and the Braves that was voted on by the commission calls for $300 million in upfront taxpayer support for the stadium. The payment would come from existing property taxes that now pay off debt for park projects and from lodging taxes, a rental car tax and levies on business in a special commercial district around the stadium site.

The Braves‘ initial contribution to the project would be $280 million. The remaining $92 million would come from debt that the county assigns to the team, bringing the Braves‘ share to $372 million, or 55 percent of the total.

The Braves have promised to cover construction cost overruns. But the team also reserves the right to reduce the total cost of the project by $50 million, absorbing all the savings without reducing the public contribution.

The total $672 million construction estimate does not include maintenance and capital improvements at the stadium, which the team and the county would share over the 30-year agreement. Neither party has released detailed numbers for those costs.