- The Washington Times - Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Virginia Attorney General Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II, who cast his own ballot in the Virginia governor’s race Tuesday morning, says he’s still making calls to undecided voters and that reading tea leaves on any broader implications for the race is best left to the professional prognosticators.

Mr. Cuccinelli is casting his race against Democrat Terry McAuliffe, who also voted Tuesday morning, as a referendum on President Obama’s health care overhaul, and said on MSNBC’s “The Daily Rundown” that the focus has crystalized recently because HealthCare.gov went live for people to start signing up for health insurance through exchanges on Oct. 1.

But what would it mean for Obamacare should Mr. Cuccinelli lose, asked host Chuck Todd?


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“You know, Chuck, I kind of leave that to pundits like you,” Mr. Cuccinelli said. “My job is really just to make the contrast.”

Appearing later on MSNBC, Rep. Jim Moran, Virginia Democrat, insisted that Obamacare is a winning issue and that Republicans like Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who say Virginia will send a message to the country on the issue, are correct in a sense.

Terry brought President Obama in Sunday, so he’s not running away from the Affordable Care Act,” Mr. Moran said. “I agree with Marco Rubio — Virginia will send a very clear message to the country — but I think it’s a different message than he anticipates.”

And what of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who is well on his way to a romp in the deep-blue Garden State and is running as more of a moderate than Mr. Cuccinelli?

“Well, you know, New Jersey’s a whole lot different than Virginia and he’s an incumbent and I’m not, so again I leave that really more to the pundits,” Mr. Cuccinelli said. “I’m focused [on] talking to one voter at a time. That’s what I started doing at my own polliing place. I’m working my way back through my old state Senate district in Fairfax, and then we’ll work our way down to Richmond. [I’m] answering questions. I’m calling undecided voters during the day, and just trying to get people all the information they need.”

Early reports on turnout in the race suggest a slow but steady stream of voters into polling places such as Clarendon and McLean. Given recent public polls, higher turnout is generally thought to favor Mr. McAuliffe and the Democratic ticket. Despite the nasty campaign between Mr. Cuccinelli and Mr. McAuliffe, some are predicting a better showing than in 2009, when 40 percent of voters turned out to elect Republican Gov. Bob McDonnell by nearly 20 points.

John Whitbeck, the chairman of the 10th Congressional District Republican Committee, wrote in an e-mail to supporters that there have been several reports of computer and voting machine glitches in precincts in Loudoun County, the rapidly-growing Northern Virginia exurb that has been somewhat of a bellwether area in recent elections.

“Please note that in many cases these glitches have been resolved, but in all cases, voting is proceeding,” Mr. Whitbeck wrote.

Robert Sarvis, a third-party candidate, is running as a Libertarian.

Here are the candidates’ schedules for the rest of Tuesday, as released by their campaigns:

Cuccinelli

10:15 a.m.
Fairfax Precinct
131 – EAGLE VIEW
Eagle View Elementary School
4500 Dixie Hill Road
Fairfax, VA 22030

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