- Associated Press - Monday, October 14, 2013

LOS ANGELES — In a matchup sparse on offense, the Los Angeles Dodgers managed just enough to pull themselves back into the NL championship series.

They snapped a stretch of 22 innings without a run scored in the fourth inning Monday night, and went on to beat Adam Wainwright and the St. Louis Cardinals 3-0 in Game 3.

Runs have come at a trickle through the first three games, with the nine combined runs the fewest ever through the same span of a league championship series. Los Angeles hadn’t scored since the third inning of Game 1.

It hasn’t been a good series for pitching aces either. Los Angeles started its pair — Zack Greinke and Clayton Kershaw — in Games 1 and 2, and lost in St. Louis. The Cardinals went with Wainwright on the road, and were beaten.


“It’s the great thing about the game of baseball that you can talk about this is what should happen, but it never does play out that way,” said Adrian Gonzalez, whose RBI double ended a 1-for-17 drought for the Dodgers with runners in scoring position.

Los Angeles trimmed its deficit to 2-1 in the best-of-seven series.

Game 4 is Tuesday at Dodger Stadium, with Ricky Nolasco scheduled to make his postseason debut against St. Louis right-hander Lance Lynn.

“Everybody’s trying to do the best they can to get to the World Series,” Dodgers rookie Yasiel Puig said through a translator.

Rookie Hyun-Jin Ryu outpitched Wainwright with seven innings of three-hit ball, and Puig celebrated twice on his RBI triple for the Dodgers. An ailing Hanley Ramirez added a run-scoring hit as Los Angeles handed Wainwright his first postseason loss.

“The playoffs are one-day momentum swings,” Dodgers manager Don Mattingly said. “Right now I feel like we’ve kind of grabbed it.”

Puig’s youthful exuberance, which energized the Dodgers as they surged from last place to first during a torrid midseason stretch, was on full display in the fourth inning.

The 22-year-old Cuban defector was so excited when he connected that he raised his arms immediately and stood in the batter’s box to watch the flight of the ball toward right field, clearly thinking it was going out of the park.

Once he realized it wasn’t, Puig started charging. He roared into third base and clapped his hands before raising them again as the sellout crowd of 53,940 cheered.

Puig had reason to exult, having struck out seven times in the series before getting his first hit.

“He brings unbelievable energy every day,” Ramirez said. “When we spoke to him, he told me, ‘I got it today,’ and he did. He’s a great player.”

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