Vets join fight to find, capture child predators

First group of 17 sworn in for duty

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Mr. Blau said that rather than being a tough job after the trauma of war, the veterans are uniquely positioned to handle what can be a trying job, given the material they come across.

“We’ve been through a lot, we’ve been able to process and deal with what we’ve done already so I feel we are a strong case for individuals to do this,” he said. “We have a great drive in wanting to complete the mission, which would be helping out children. Each one of us has been through a tremendous amount of trauma and seen horrific things.”

He said after what he’s learned, he’s already talked to his own children, telling them that they can always trust him and tell him if they feel someone is acting strange or has touched them. He said predators are master manipulators, and are often relatives or close adult friends, and the only way to combat their manipulation is for parents to have good lines of communication with children.

“Like we say, it’s a whole different terrorist,” he said.

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