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And then crew chief John Hirschbeck then walked toward the Cardinals dugout on the third-base side, motioning with his left hand for Cardinals manager Mike Matheny to come out. He told him that Pedroia was being called safe, and Matheny spent 1 1/2 minutes arguing to no avail, repeatedly jabbing his right index finger in the air.

“That’s not a play I’ve ever seen before,” Matheny said. “And I’m pretty sure there were six umpires on the field that had never seen that play before either. It’s a pretty tough time to debut that overruled call in the World Series. Now, I get that trying to get the right call. I get that. Tough one to swallow.”

DeMuth admitted he got it wrong.

`’I stayed with the foot too long. That’s how I ended up getting in trouble,” he said. “And when I was coming up, all I could see was a hand coming out and the ball on the ground. All right? So I was assuming.”

When he saw his crewmates converging on him, DeMuth knew he had made a mistake.

“It’s an awful feeling, yeah. Especially when I’m sure I have the right call,” he said.

Hirschbeck said in the end it wasn’t a difficult decision for the crew.

“‘When I hear all five of us say we are 100 percent, then I say, `OK, we need to change this.’ It’s as simple as that,” he said.

Major League Baseball started using video review to assist umpires in 2008, but only to decide whether potential home runs went over fences or were fair balls.

Under rules changes likely to be approved for next season, video will be used for virtually every call other than balls and strikes. Managers would be allowed one challenge over the first six innings and two from the seventh inning on. Officials in New York City would make the final ruling.

Speaking softly in a corner of the cramped visitors’ clubhouse, Kozma seemed like a player who felt he had let his team down.

“You saw what happened the rest of the night,” he said. “If I catch that ball and turn that double play, it stays nothing-nothing.”