Rarity for top teams to meet in World Series

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ST. LOUIS (AP) - The teams with the best records in each league used to meet in the World Series every year.

Now it’s a rarity.

Boston and St. Louis are the first since 1999, when the New York Yankees swept Atlanta.

“You definitely have to be hot and play good baseball, maybe for a little bit longer,” Boston pitcher Jake Peavy said before his Game 3 start Saturday night.

From 1903 through 1968, the top teams had to meet in the World Series. There were no playoffs.

Then the AL voted in May 1968 to split into divisions the following year when the Kansas City Royals and Seattle Pilots joined to create a 12-club league. While the NL was adding the Montreal Expos and San Diego Padres, it initially refused to start a playoff.

“It would be a contradiction of baseball history and tradition to divide the league and then see a team that finished fourth or fifth in percentage playing in the World Series,” NL President Warren Giles said at the time.

Two months later, the NL gave in when owners met again in Houston after the All-Star game at the Astrodome. The two division winners would meet in a league championship series, initially best-of-five and then expanded to best-of-seven starting in 1985. In the 25 years of a four-team postseason, the World Series featured the top teams in each league just nine times.

Then in September 1993, a year after Bud Selig became acting commissioner, owners voted to split each league into three divisions the following year and add another round of playoffs, a best-of-five division series. The postseason would double to eight teams.

The vote was 27-1, with Texas Rangers owner George W. Bush _ the future president _ the lone dissenter.

“I made my arguments and went down in flames,” Bush said. “History will prove me right.”

After a one-year delay caused by the 7 1/2-month players’ strike, the expanded playoffs began in 1995, when teams played a 144-game schedule because of the walkout. The top teams met that October, with Atlanta defeating Cleveland in six games.

It didn’t happen again until 1999. And after that until this year, the second after the playoffs expanded to 10 teams with the addition of a second wild card in each league.

“That’s another manifestation of how tough it is,” Selig said this week.

Selig defends his system, pointing out fewer teams make the MLB playoffs than in the other major leagues (12 of 32 in the NFL, 16 of 30 in the NBA and NHL).

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