Meghan McCain: Some say ‘I’m the second coming’ of Republicanism

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Meghan McCain said she’s already defied the odds by not disappearing from the public stage after her father’s failed 2008 presidential campaign, and that part of the reason is some regard her as the new face of the Republican Party.

“People project onto me what they want me to be,” said Ms. McCain, the daughter of Arizona Sen. John McCain, in Politico. “If they want me to be this spoiled, crass senator’s daughter, then they will create that and say that to be on Twitter and write articles on me.”

Others, meanwhile, “think I’m the second coming of the new wave of Republicanism,” she said, adding in Politico that either way, that’s incorrect. “I don’t think it’s fair to either demagogue me or put myself up on a pedestal.”

Ms. McCain — who has famously slammed conservative icon Ann Coulter in public rants, and in April tweeted that “People like ann coulter are part of the past” — nonetheless said she didn’t represent the GOP.

“I’m not speaking for all young Republicans,” she said, Politico reported. “There are some very conservative Republicans out there. I just speak for whoever wants me to speak for them.”

Ms. McCain hosts a television show on the Pivot network called “Raising McCain.” And she said her ability to last through the years has angered many.

“I get strong hate and strong love, but I think what pisses people off is the fact that I’m still here,” she said, in Politico. “I think I was supposed to go away and die after the 2008 campaign and I’m really not supposed to be here at 29, still working in the media, still having fun and having a voice. People just seem pissed off that, if you have a famous parent, you’re not allowed to be ambitious and want a career.”

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