LAMBRO: Finger-pointer in chief

The president won’t face up to his Obamacare failure

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However, Mr. Obama is still peddling bigger government, as is his party, even though polls show more Americans now want government to do less. In November 2008, voter exit polling showed 51 percent wanted government to do more for them. By Election Day 2012, 51 percent said government was doing too much.

On Wednesday, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said she alone was responsible for the problems with the rollout. A prominent Democrat is suggesting that the law’s real problems rest with Mr. Obama, who doesn’t like to dirty his hands with the complicated details of governing. The president “doesn’t seem to be as relentlessly curious about the processes of government — whether the legislative process or the implementation process or the administrative … process,” says William Galston, who was President Clinton’s chief domestic policy adviser.

That’s when things can go wrong, and then “people start wondering if he’s in charge, if he’s a strong leader,” Mr. Galston said.

What’s shaping up here is another catastrophic failure of big government trying to do what the private sector can do better for a lot less money. The person responsible for all of this is the bystander who now sits in the Oval Office — trying to point the finger of blame at everybody else.

Donald Lambro is a syndicated columnist and contributor to The Washington Times.

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