Thomas Bach, former Olympic gold medalist, is new IOC president

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BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — Within minutes of being elected to the top job in the Olympics, Thomas Bach got a phone call from a powerful leader he’ll work with closely in the next few months: Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Bach, a 59-year-old German lawyer, was elected Tuesday as president of the International Olympic Committee. He succeeds Jacques Rogge, who stepped down after 12 years.

Bach, the longtime favorite, defeated five candidates in a secret ballot for the most influential job in international sports, keeping the presidency in European hands.

The former Olympic fencer received 49 votes in the second round to secure a winning majority. Richard Carrion of Puerto Rico finished second with 29 votes.

One of the first congratulatory phone calls came from Putin, who will host the IOC in less than five months at the Winter Olympics in the southern Russian resort of Sochi.

The Sochi Games are one of Putin’s pet projects, with Russia’s prestige on the line.

“He congratulated and (said) there would be close cooperation to make (sure of) the success of the Sochi Games,” Bach told The Associated Press.

The buildup to the Feb. 7-23 games has been overshadowed by concerns with cost overruns, human rights, a budget topping $50 billion, security threats and a Western backlash against a Russian law against gay “propaganda.”

Bach and the IOC have been told by the Russians there would be no discrimination against anyone in Sochi, and that Russia would abide by the Olympic Charter.

“We have the assurances of the highest authorities in Russia that we trust,” Bach said.

It remains unclear what would happen if athletes or spectators demonstrate against the anti-gay law. Rogge said this week the IOC would send a reminder to athletes that, under the Olympic Charter, they are prohibited from making any political gestures.

“We will work on our project now and then it will be communicated to the NOCs (national Olympic committees) and then athletes,” Bach said. “It will be elaborated more in detail.”

At his first news conference as president, Bach was asked about how the IOC would deal with human rights issues in host countries. The IOC has been criticized for not speaking out against abuses in countries like China and Russia.

“The IOC cannot be apolitical,” Bach said. “We have to realize that our decisions at events like Olympic Games, they have political implications. And when taking these decisions we have to, of course, consider political implications.

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