Bonds says he wants to start serving sentence

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The three-judge appeals court panel Friday rejected Bonds‘ argument that his rambling testimony didn’t amount to felony obstruction. Riordan argued that Bonds‘ answer was, in fact, true: He felt the pressure of being a child of a celebrity.

But Judge Mary Schroeder said that didn’t matter. She said it was obvious Bonds meant to mislead _ and obstruct _ the grand jury’s investigation into his use of performance-enhancing drugs, often called PEDs.

“The statement served to divert the grand jury’s attention away from the relevant inquiry of the investigation, which was Anderson and BALCO’s distribution of steroids and PEDs,” Schroeder wrote. “The statement was therefore evasive.”

Schroeder and her two colleagues also rejected arguments that the trial judge had issued improper jury instructions.

“We conclude there was sufficient evidence to convict Bonds of obstructing justice,” Schroeder said.

San Francisco U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag said, “We are gratified by the court’s decision and believe justice is served.”

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