Continued from page 1

“This is so much good fortune it’s almost too much to bear,” said Louis-Dreyfus. “I’m very grateful to have the opportunity to make people laugh. It’s a joyful way to make a living.”

Parsons added to the awards he won in 2011 and 2010 for the role of a science nerd.

“My heart, oh my heart. I want you to know I’m very aware of how exceedingly fortunate I am,” he said.

Laura Linney was named best actress in a miniseries or movie for “The Big C: Hereafter.” ”The Voice” won best reality-competition program, and Tina Fey won for writing “30 Rock.”

Michael Douglas was honored as best actor for his portrayal of Liberace in “Behind the Candelabra,” besting his co-star Matt Damon. The film also captured a top trophy as best movie or miniseries.

“This is a two-hander and Matt, you’re only as good as your other hand,” Douglas said, then got really racy: “You want the bottom or the top?”

Bobby Cannavale, from “Boardwalk Empire,” won as best supporting actor in a drama, and Anna Gunn from “Breaking Bad” won the best actress award in the same category.

In the variety show category, “The Colbert Report” broke a 10-year winning streak held by “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.” It also won for best writing for a variety show.

The ceremony’s first hour was relatively somber, with memorial tributes and a doleful song by Elton John in honor of the late musical star Liberace, the subject of the nominated biopic “Behind the Candelabra.”

“Liberace left us 25 years ago and what a difference those years have made to people like me,” said John, who is openly gay in contrast to the closeted Liberace portrayed in the TV movie.

Jane Lynch paid tribute to Cory Monteith, her “Glee” co-star who died at age 31 in July of a drug and alcohol overdose. “His death is a tragic reminder of the rapacious, senseless destruction that is brought on by addiction,” she said.

Edie Falco recalled her late “The Sopranos” co-star James Gandolfini, saluting him for his “fierce loyalty” to his friends and family and his work with military veterans, while Rob Reiner remembered Jean Stapleton of “All in the Family” and Michael J. Fox honored “Family Ties” producer Gary David Goldberg.

Diahann Carroll, the first African-American Emmy nominee in 1963 for “Naked City,” created one of the night’s most heartfelt moments when she took the stage with Washington and noted the importance of diversity in the industry and Emmys.

“Tonight, she better get this award,” Carroll said of Washington, who covered her eyes in embarrassment.

HBO received a leading seven Emmys, followed by Showtime with four, ABC and NBC with three each and AMC and Comedy Central with two each.

Story Continues →