The Wrap: From toppled Ten Commandments to Lois Lerner’s IRS retirement, the week that was

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That’s canon law, not opinion, he said. Canon 915 states that Catholics who are stubbornly contrary “in manifest grave sin are not to be admitted to Holy Communion.”

And Cardinal Burke said Mrs. Pelosi fits the definition.

U.S. command in Afghanistan gives Army 60 days to fix or replace intel network

The Pentagon’s main battlefield intelligence network in Afghanistan is vulnerable to hackers — both the enemy or a leaker — and the U.S. command in Kabul will cut it off from the military’s classified data files unless the Army fixes the defects within 60 days, according to an official memo obtained by The Washington Times.

The confidential memo says the Army’s Distributed Common Ground System (DCGS) flunked a readiness test and does not confirm the sources of outside Internet addresses entering the classified database.

Vandals topple Ten Commandments statue near Supreme Court building

A stone monument of the Ten Commandments that sits across the street from the U.S. Supreme Court was toppled by vandals over the weekend.

The 3-by-3-foot monument, which weighs 850 pounds, sits in front of the headquarters of the evangelical Christian group Faith and Action.

“We’re confounded, absolutely mystified, how a collection of people could get away with this kind of damage,” said the Rev. Rob Schenck, who leads the Christian group. “The Ten Commandments is something that unites people. It’s disappointing to say the least. Heartbreaking — that’s the word I used with my staff.”

SIMMONS: Cantor turns up heat in debate for school choice

If you want to know where school choice stands today, the No. 2 leader in the U.S. House of Representations gave a pretty clear indication Monday by opening a new battlefront and throwing an obvious lifeline to Republicans, moderates and conservatives.

Ted Cruz now leads GOP presidential pack: poll

Fresh off his 21-hour filibuster against Obamacare funding, a new poll shows that Sen. Ted Cruz has leapfrogged past his potential rivals for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination and that GOP primary voters trust him more than their party leaders on Capitol Hill.

The Public Policy Polling survey found that 20 percent of those surveyed supported Mr. Cruz, Texas Republican, while 17 percent supposed Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, 14 percent supported New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and 11 percent supported former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.

‘Star Wars’ no longer science fiction: Harvard, MIT scientists create lightsaber

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