Rush Limbaugh’s new book: ‘True story on Thanksgiving … no politics in this’

Question of the Day

Is it still considered bad form to talk politics during a social gathering?

View results

Rush Limbaugh announced Thursday during his radio broadcast that he’s releasing a new book aimed at telling his version of the very American holiday, Thanksgiving, in a way that’s meaningful for children, absent political tampering.

Mr. Limbaugh, 62, said his wife actually sparked the idea for “Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims: Time-Travel Adventures with Exceptional Americans.”

He said, Fox News reported: “My wife Kathryn came up with an idea that literally lit a fire under me. She said, ‘You know, you’re always talking about how history is being mistaught. You’re right. You’re always talking about what kids are learning these days, and they’re not learning about the greatness of America. They’re not learning about the founding days. They’re not learning the right things about the great people, the exceptional people in this country.’ She said, ‘why don’t you write a book for kids?’ “

The book is available on Amazon for pre-sale. It will be released in October. The Washington Post reported Mr. Limbaugh describing the book as “just the truthful history of the Pilgrims, who they were, where they came from, why they came here, what happened when they got here. The true story of Thanksgiving. There’s no politics in this.”

Rush Revere is a character on Mr. Limbaugh’s radio host organization, called Two If By Tea. The Two If By Tea website explains the character this way: “Rush Revere is a modern-day Paul Revere who rides around America espousing fundamental American values. He is a close friend of Rush Limbaugh who sounds the alarm that The Liberals Are Coming! Dressed in attire from the American Revolution, he recalls the early days of the new Republic. An illustration capturing Rush Revere on his horse graces every bottle of Two If By Tea.”

Mr. Limbaugh has two successful books under his belt — the 1993 “See, I Told You So” and the 1992 “The Way Things Ought to Be.”

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks