- Associated Press - Saturday, April 12, 2014

LONG BEACH, Calif. (AP) - Paul Tracy, one of the most outspoken and polarizing drivers in recent history, has been given a microphone to opine about the current state of IndyCar.

Tracy begins a six-race stint as an analyst for NBC Sports Network on Sunday at the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach. It’s a dream-come-true for race fans, who have longed for someone with Tracy’s candor and knowledge to tell it like it is in the booth.

Although Tracy never held back on or off the track during his driving days, he’s not sure how far he can push the envelope in the booth.

“I’d like to keep this gig,” he joked in an interview with The Associated Press. “Everybody keeps saying, ‘Be you, don’t hold back, don’t be PC.’ We’ll see how it goes. I’m sure this first race, I’m going to be a little nervous.”

Tracy, tied with Sebastien Bourdais and Dario Franchitti for eighth on the career victory list with 31, hasn’t competed in the series since he ran six races in 2011. He has dabbled in sports car racing, ran once in Robby Gordon’s super trucks series last year in his hometown of Toronto, but has mostly been settling into life after racing.

It included a short stint on Canadian TV last year during IndyCar coverage, but it was far different than the analyst role he’ll be playing with NBC Sports.

“It was five races, but a lot was fairly scripted,” Tracy said. “We had story lines, for use in pre-race and during commercial time. So I’ve never done a full length race. There’s a lot to talk about on the fly, a lot to comment on.”

He believes he and Townsend Bell, another analyst who still occasionally competes, are suited well to entertain and educate the fans.

“There’s a lot of things I catch, and Townsend catches a lot of things, that a lot of guys who have been out of a car a long time don’t see anymore,” Tracy said. “When I sit down and watch an IndyCar race or a NASCAR race or a sports car race, I catch things on the camera views that a lot of people miss. Those are the things that I would like to talk about.”

Bell said the network wants vintage Tracy in the booth.

“He just kind of kicks back, crosses his arms like the big bull that he is and pipes off when he wants,” Bell said. “But the producers are in my ear saying ‘Keep poking him, let’s get some of that old PT back.’ I can tell in the back of his mind, he’s thinking about a career in television, so it’s a real tug of war for him.”

Tracy has a lot of opinions about the series and its participants, and he’s not shy about airing his observations. Whether he does so in the booth remains to be seen, but if he gets comfortable, fans could be treated to many of his musings:

Here are five things Tracy could talk about in the booth:

ON GRAHAM RAHAL and MARCO ANDRETTI: “I was disappointed in Rahal’s performance at St. Pete. He needs to get going. He’s young, but he’s been in the best equipment his whole career. Right now he’s got all the money, all the sponsors, hand-picked engineering teams, and the first race didn’t go well. I’d like to see him get it going.

And everybody said last year, the first half of the season, Marco was really on it and it looked like his driving really came to another level. They were mediocre in the race in St. Pete, which really wasn’t of his doing. But those are two guys that I want to see - it’s time to step it up.”

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