- Associated Press - Monday, April 14, 2014

AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) - For all the crazy stunts Bubba Watson does for fun, the green jacket was off limits.

When he won the Masters for the first time in 2012, he went to New York the next day for a media tour. He wore his green jacket walking the streets of Manhattan while going from one interview to the next one, and he was amazed by the attention it brought. No other piece of clothing in golf gets that kind of reaction.

But that was the extent of it.

Watson spoke about his year with the green jacket a week before returning to Augusta National to claim another one.

“I left it in the closet,” he said. “Right or wrong, out of respect for the tournament and what it means, I didn’t take it out too much. Didn’t let my friends see it. Didn’t let them touch it. It’s a coveted trophy. It’s a big deal. And I know what kind of hard work it takes to get it.”

Watson was reminded of that hard work when he won the Masters on Sunday by three shots over 20-year-old Jordan Spieth and Jonas Blixt of Sweden.

Even in perfect weather - four days of sunshine, wind no more vexing than usual - only seven players broke par. And while Watson didn’t have to go extra holes and hit a wild hook out of the trees that “made me famous” as it did in 2012, just walking up the 18th fairway with a three-shot lead was no less exhausting.

“The first one for me, it’s almost like I lucked into it,” he said. “This one was a lot of hard work, dedication, and I got back here.”

He understands now that the hard work is just starting.

For a guy who says he has never been drunk, Watson knows all about hangovers. Majors can be a life-changing moment, and it was more than he could handle two years ago when he first won the Masters. He signed more yellow pin flags than he cares to remember. There were obligations to his sponsors.

And there was a new son at home.

Along with the typical distractions of celebrity, Watson and his wife, Angie, adopted a boy just weeks before the 2012 Masters.

“We got him a month old,” he said of his son, Caleb. “So getting used to smell, touch, feel, sound, everything … I had to be there for my son. Golf was the farthest thing from my mind. I took off some tournaments. Trying to be a good husband, a good dad, at that moment was the most important thing.”

“This one,” he added, “is a little different.”

Much is expected of major champions. Win two of them and the expectations get even higher. The question is whether Watson can develop some staying power.

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