Continued from page 1

SIGNATURE MOMENT: The defining shot for Watson might have been his drive on the 13th hole.

During a surprise visit to Golf Channel on Tuesday morning, Watson said he once reached the par 5 in two with a pitching wedge when he played college golf at Georgia. This time, he came out of his shoes with a big fade that started further left than he wanted, clipped a tree and still came back to earth 366 yards away.

“His drive on 13, I’ll never forget,” Spieth said.

Even though Watson followed with a most ordinary sand wedge to 25 feet and left the eagle putt woefully short, it was a psychological blow. With that kind of power, Watson wasn’t losing a three-shot over the final five holes unless he gave it away. And he didn’t.

FLOWERING CRAB APPLE: That’s the name of the par-3 fourth hole, and it was poison to a couple of players. Spieth made No. 4 memorable for holing his bunker shot in the final round of birdie. Go back to Saturday to find Brandt Snedeker coming off back-to-back birdies to reach 2-under par. He hit into the bunker, blasted out to about 5 feet, and then five-putted from there for triple bogey.

Matt Kuchar chipped in from behind the third green to briefly share the lead on Sunday. He hit a reasonable tee shot, about 60 feet away, and four-putted for double bogey. He made only one birdie the rest of the way.

NEXT YEAR: The top 12 are invited back to the Masters next year (it used to be top 16 until last year).

For the last five years, someone who finished one shot out of the top 12 or top 16 failed to get back to Augusta the following April - David Toms, Ben Crane, Ricky Barnes, Scott Verplank and Aaron Baddeley. In the final year of his exemption from winning the 2009 British Open, Stewart Cink closed with a bogey-free 68. He finished one shot out of the top 12.

Cink has work to do to get back to Augusta.