- Associated Press - Friday, April 18, 2014

Sunday, April 20

On this date in 1825, Charles Poston, “Father of Arizona,” was born.

On this date in 1877, the town of Globe was founded.

On this date in 1920, a gasoline shortage forced many stations to close.

On this date in 1927, the town of Globe celebrated its 50th anniversary with 50,000 people, including Gov. George W.P. Hunt who had first entered Globe in 1881, riding a mule and seeking his fortune.

On this date in 1931, funeral services were held for Mrs. Helen Duett Hunt, wife of Arizona Gov. George W.P. Hunt.

Monday, April 21

On this date in 1877, John Clum, with Clay Beauford and his Apache Police Force, arrested Geronimo and 13 other Apache renegades at Ojo Caliente, New Mexico.

On this date in 1904, Edward Tewksbury, the last survivor of the Graham-Tewksbury feud, died.

On this date in 1917, an agricultural conference meeting at the University of Arizona was startled when Dr. A.E. Vinson recommended slaughtering 25,000 wild burros and grinding the meat to make bologna.

On this date in 1928, Maricopa and Pima counties battled over their boundaries before the State Supreme Court.

Tuesday, April 22

On this date in 1919, the government opened its case in the Phoenix trial of two Cocopah Indians charged with the slaying of their tribal medicine man who failed to halt a flu bug.

On this date in 1919, contracts were signed by Pima and Pinal County authorities and the U.S. Forest Service for the construction of a road from Oracle to Soldier’s Camp in the Catalina Mountains.

On this date in 1920, prominent society and club women started a boycott on potatoes to protest the price. Housewives in Phoenix were called and asked to support the boycott and tell five friends to do the same.

On this date in 1938, the head of the Maricopa County Highway Safety squad was tried in Tempe Justice Court on charges of reckless driving.

Wednesday, April 23

On this date in 1850, Yuma Indians attacked the ferry at the Yuma Crossing. Fifteen people were killed and three reached safety on the west coast.

On this date in 1886, fire destroyed a block of business buildings in Phoenix. The town had no fire department or water works.

On this date in 1919, U.S. Marshals raided two underground stills located in an abandoned mining shaft near Jerome.

On this date in 1919, The Arizona Daily Star reported that tests and experiments were to be conducted for the first time concerning the use of airplanes to spot forest fires and transport firefighters.

Thursday, April 24

On this date in 1880, St. Mary’s Hospital in Tucson opened, staffed by the Sisters of St. Joseph.

On this date in 1909, the town of Wickenburg was incorporated by a vote of 36 to 5.

On this date in 1919, agreement was reached clearing the way for the construction of the Florence diversion dam on the Gila River. The dam was expected to irrigate 62,000 acres of land in the Casa Grande Valley.

On this date in 1925, the Phoenix Chamber of Commerce circulated a straw ballot on the proposition that the name of the Salt River Valley be changed to Roosevelt Valley, but the proposal met with strong opposition.

Friday, April 25

On this date in 1854, the Gadsden Purchase was ratified and signed by President Franklin Pierce. It became effective June 30.

On this date in 1877, schools in Tucson were closed because of a smallpox epidemic.

On this date in 1896, a plague swept the hog farms in the Salt River Valley and 8,000 hogs died in the following three months.

On this date in 1898, Gov. Myron H. McCord received official authorization to enlist volunteers for the Rough Riders.

On this date in 1933, bandits held up the Valley Bank at Globe and escaped with $34,000.

Saturday, April 26

On this date in 1901, notorious Arizona outlaw Black Jack Ketchum was hanged in Clayton, New Mexico. The rope broke and Ketchum’s head came off.

On this date in 1925, a monument honoring Charles D. Poston as the “Father of Arizona” was dedicated on Poston Butte, near Florence.

On this date in 1930, The Winslow Daily Mail announced that with plans underway in other states to complete their paving, only the Arizona section or Route 66 would remain unpaved.

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